beer and brewing in Chicago (book)

Bob Skilnik, Beer: A History of Brewing in Chicago (Barricade Books, 2006).  This appears to be a revision of Skilnik's A History of Beer and Brewing in Chicago, 1833-1978 (Pogo, 1999) and A History of Beer and Brewing in Chicago, vol. 2 (Infinity, 2002).

Posted by David Fahey on July 25, 2006 at 05:26 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

American brewing history (reprint)

John P. Arnold and Frank Penman, History of the Brewing Industry and Brewing Science in America (U.S. Brewers Association, 1933; reprint editon, BeerBooks.com, 2006).

Posted by David Fahey on July 25, 2006 at 05:17 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

American breweries, 1865-1920 (article)

Martin Stack, "Local and regional breweries in America's brewing industry, 1865-1920," Business History Review 74/3 (Autumn 2000): 435-463

Posted by David Fahey on July 23, 2006 at 06:46 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

British brewery (book)

J.W. Hartland and K. Davies, Mitchells and Butlers: a history of Cape Hill Brewery, 1878 - 2002 ([Birmingham?] : [Mitchells and Butlers?], [2003?]). 138 pages.

Posted by David Fahey on July 23, 2006 at 06:42 PM in Brewing , Britain | Permalink

Brooklyn's breweries, 1890-1900 (booklet)

Although Brooklyn once was one of America's major brewing centers, academic and non-academic historians have combined to write little about its late nineteenth-century breweries. The best guide is a 79-page typescript by David Raubvogel (with the assistance of the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society), Brooklyn's Golden Age of Brewery, 1890-1900 (1999). The Queens Borough Public Library lists a copy.

Posted by David Fahey on July 14, 2006 at 03:53 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

brewing in New Hampshire (book)

Glenn A. Knoblock, Brewing in New Hampshire (Arcadia, 2004). From colonial times.

Posted by David Fahey on July 9, 2006 at 05:14 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Ram Brewery closes

The Ram Brewery, "the oldest continuous beer-making site in Britain," has closed. The Independent will charge you to read more of this 300-word article.

Posted by Jon Miller on June 10, 2006 at 04:06 PM in Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces | Permalink

beer blog reviews for Britain

Alan McLeod discusses several books on beer and brewing in Britain at his blog and includes emails from one of the authors, Martyn Cornell.  The books mentioned are Cornell's Beer: The Story of the Pint (Headline, 2003), Peter Haydon, Beer and Britannia: An Inebriated History of Britain  (Sutton, 2001), Pete Brown, Man Walks into a Pub (Macmillan, 2003), and Michael Jackson, The English Pub (Harper & Row, 1976).  Cornell argues that in place of footnotes he provides an extensive bibliography and that unlike Brown and especially Haydon, his book is more about beers, brewers, and brewing and less about pubs.  For details see here.

Posted by David Fahey on June 10, 2006 at 03:08 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces, United Kingdom | Permalink

Guinness family of brewers (book)

Derek A. Wilson, Dark and Light: the Story of the Guinness Family (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1998).

Posted by David Fahey on May 31, 2006 at 07:08 PM in Brewing , Britain, Ireland, United Kingdom | Permalink

breweries in Birmingham, England (booklet)

Joseph McKenna, Birmingham Breweries (Studley: Brewin Books, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:58 PM in Brewing , Britain, United Kingdom | Permalink

brewing in western Canada (book)

William A. Hagelund, House of Suds: a History of Beer Brewing in Western Canada (Surrey, British Columbia, and Blaine, Washington: Hancock House, 2003.

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:42 PM in Brewing , Canada | Permalink

brewers in Hertfordshire (book)

Allan Whitaker, Brewers in Hertfordshire (Hatfield: University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006).

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:39 PM in Brewing , United Kingdom | Permalink

brewing in Chicago (book)

Bob Skilnik, Beer: a History of Brewing in Chicago (Fort Lee, NJ: Barricade Books, 2006).

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:37 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

beer and brewing in Denmark (book)

Kristof Glamann, Beer and Brewing in Pre-Industrial Denmark (Odense: Syddansk Universitetsforlag; distributed in North America, Portland, Oregon: International Specialized Book Services, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:35 PM in Beer, Brewing , Denmark | Permalink

brewing in Minnesota (article)

Michael R. Worcester, "John Orth: Hennepin County's Pioneer Brewer," Hennepin History 65/2 (Spring 2006): 28-32. John Orth, 1821-1887, Minnesota brewer.

Posted by David Fahey on May 27, 2006 at 12:31 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

Beer & breweries (books for sale)

Books for sale (section, beer & breweries) at English bookdealer, Liquid Literature.  For details, see here.  Examples include P. Nicholson, Brewer at Bay: The Memoirs of Sir Paul Nicholson. (Spennymoor, County Durham: the Memoir Club, 2003), and Bob Ricketts, Gone for a Burton: Memoirs from a Great British Heritage (London: Pen Press Publishers, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on May 26, 2006 at 09:24 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Australian breweries (book)

Keith M. Deutsher, Breweries of Australia: a History (Port Melbourne, Victoria: Lothianm, 1999).

Posted by David Fahey on May 13, 2006 at 02:08 PM in Australia, Brewing | Permalink

Ohio breweries (books)

To the best of my knowledge, there is only one "academic" history of breweries for Ohio.  The late William L. Downard's Ph.D. dissertation (Miami University) was published as The Cincinnati Brewing Industry: A Social and Economic History (Athens: Ohio University Press, 1973). 

Brewery history is America's equivalent of the urban and district public house histories that are so common in England.  Although they are not "academic historians," their authors know their subjects.  As the books have been published by local presses or by the authors themselves, they rarely have been reviewed.  Heavily illustrated, they draw more on material culture than on archival records. Sometimes they are as much about forgotten German American brewer families as they are about alcoholic drink as a business and as part of social and political history. 

In addition to Downard's scholarly monograph, Cincinnati can boast Francis H. Scholle, A Compilation of  Cincinnati and Hamilton, Ohio, Northern Kentucky and Southeastern Indiana Breweries from the 1800's to 1986 (Cincinnati: Brew-Master, 1986), Robert J. Wimberg, Cincinnati Breweries (Ohio Book Store, 1989), and Timothy J. Holian, Over the Barrel: the Brewing History and Beer Culture of Cincinnati, 1800 to the Present (2 vols., St. Joseph, MO: Sudhaus, 2000-01).  Northeastern Ohio is the best served region.  Carl H. Miller has written Breweries of Cleveland (Schnitzelbank, 1998).  A physician Robert A. Musson has written several books, including Brewing Beer in the Rubber City [Akron] (Zepp, 1997), Brewing Beer in the Buckeye State, vol. 1, A History of the Brewing Industry in Eastern Ohio from 1808 to 2004 (Zepp, 2005), and Brewing in Cleveland (Arcadia, 2005).  Presumably Musson will examine western Ohio in the near future.  For the state capital, there is Donald M. Schlegel, Lager and Liberty: German Brewers of Nineteenth Century Columbus (author, 1982); and Esther Hoster Dawson, History of the L. Hoster Brewery of Columbus, Ohio (author, 1981).  For Dayton, there is Curt Dalton, Breweries of Dayton: A Toast to Breweries of the Gem City, 1810-1967 (author, 2002), a revision of Dalton's 1995 book.  For Toledo (which lost its last brewery in 1972), there is a website devoted to the history of the city's breweries but no book.

Posted by David Fahey on May 12, 2006 at 06:21 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

brewery museum in China (thesis)

Man-ching Gordon Ho, "Brewery Museum in Qingdao, China: a Historical Place Revitalization" (M.Arch. thesis, University of Hong Kong, 1998).

Posted by David Fahey on May 12, 2006 at 11:33 AM in Brewing , China | Permalink

history of American breweries (book)

Bill Yenne, The American Brewery: From Colonial Evolution to Microbrew Revolution (Motorbooks, 2003).  Greatest number of breweries was 4131 in 1873.

Posted by David Fahey on May 11, 2006 at 11:09 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

American breweries (book)

Dale P. Van Wieren, American Breweries II (Eastern Coast Breweriana Association, 1995).  Lists over 18,000 breweries that operated till the date of publication.

Posted by David Fahey on May 11, 2006 at 10:02 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

Lemp brewery and family (book)

Stephen P. Walker, Lemp: the Haunting History (revised ed., Lemp Preservation Society, 2004).  The Lemp brewery and family of St. Louis, Missouri.

Posted by David Fahey on May 11, 2006 at 09:50 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

Experts launch new barley variety

A new high-yielding variety of barley that is also resistant to drought and disease has been introduced in Kenya. The variety, known as Nguzo, is the product of 11 years’ work by agriculture experts and researchers. Kenya Maltings agricultural manager, Paul Muthangya, said the new breed was ideal for high altitude areas such as Mau Narok and Timau.

Read more.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2006 at 01:45 PM in Beer, Brewing , Kenya | Permalink

'We are a world brewer and we need a big position in China," says Managing Director for SABMiller Africa and Asia

SABMiller expects its beer sales in China to grow by double-digit percentages in coming years, as it clamps the brakes on a recent acquisition spree to focus on its existing business. London-based SABMiller -- purveyors of Miller Lite, Peroni and Castle -- operates in China via a 49 percent owned venture called China Resources Snow Breweries Ltd., which runs 41 breweries across the country.

Reuters reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2006 at 01:43 PM in Beer, Brewing , China, United Kingdom | Permalink

Anheuser-Busch planning to tap market in India

America's largest brewer has its eyes on the world's second-largest country. Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. is engaged in talks with mid-sized breweries in India, according to a report published this week in India's Economic Times newspaper.

The St Louis Business Journal reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2006 at 01:39 PM in Beer, Brewing , India, United States | Permalink

Brewery History Society archive

The archive of the (British) Brewery History Society is located at the Birmingham Central Library which also has much other brewery history materials.

Posted by David Fahey on March 18, 2006 at 05:53 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Engineer turns beer byproducts into sweetener

The dregs from brewing beer can be converted into a sugar-free sweetener, a Canadian scientist has discovered. The CBC reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 13, 2006 at 12:28 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

UK Brewing, 1950-1990 (Book)

Alistair Mutch, Strategic and Organizational Change: From Production to Retailing in UK Brewing, 1950-1990 (Routledge, 2006).

Posted by David Fahey on March 3, 2006 at 08:36 PM in Beer, Brewing , United Kingdom | Permalink

Blasphemy

The Calgary Herald reports that the brewers of Guinness will test a new low-alcohol version of Guinness next month in an effort to reverse a slide in sales of its most popular beer. Eighty bars in the Irish city of Limerick will start selling a "Mid-Strength" version of the black stout with an alcohol level of 2.8 per cent on March 9.

Regular Guinness, praised by James Joyce as "the frothy freshener," is 4.2 per cent alcohol. "If Mid-Strength is successful, we'll roll it out across the country," said Jean Doyle, a Dublin-based spokesman for Guinness. This is the second attempt by the world's largest liquor maker to make Guinness more attractive to beer drinkers, who increasingly favour lager. In 1979, Diageo sold a lighter version of the beer with the slogan "They said it couldn't be done." The product was withdrawn two years later.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 9, 2006 at 04:32 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Ireland | Permalink

Illegal brew brings Sudan refugees cash and trouble

For Sudanese refugees languishing in camps in the arid west of the country brewing alcohol is a source of money, a source of pleasure and a source of trouble. Alcohol is forbidden under Sudan's sharia law but Zahra Abdallahi and others at the Riyad Camp in Darfur say they are driven to producing Mereissa, a drink close to beer, because of financial necessity.

Reuters reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 7, 2006 at 11:57 AM in Alcohol (general), Beer, Brewing , Prohibition, Religion, Sudan | Permalink

Hamas special brew

The future looks bleak for brewers in Palestinian territories as hardline Islamists shut down bars.  At the only brewery in the Palestinian territories, though, they believe they can see the future. And under the government of the Islamic movement, Hamas, it is alcohol-free and green.

The London Times reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 1, 2006 at 02:22 PM in Beer, Brewing , Jordan, Religion | Permalink

I'm prepared to believe what the beer doctor tells me

London's Sun Online reports that a strong lager which promises less of a hangover is to go on sale in British supermarkets. The makers of Lady Bird Bio Beer also claim it PROTECTS the liver and cuts cholesterol. The brew — five per cent strong, the same as Stella Artois — contains extracts of aloe vera and herbs thought to have medicinal qualities. It has been a big hit in India since its launch there last summer. Creator Dr Srinivasa Amarnath claims that drinking the beer over a long period can also help prevent ulcers and gastric trouble.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 28, 2006 at 02:53 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

I feel so violated

On your way home from work you decide to pick up a few beers. You bypass that 'Canadian classic' Labatt Blue, and consider Keith’s, which hits closer to your Maritime roots. Or maybe you’re in the mood for something a little classier, so you consider a posh Stella Artois. In the end you decide to go with Löwenbräu, an old-fashioned German brew.

It looks like you have a lot of choice, but the shelves are misleading. InBev, the world’s largest brewing company, owns all of these brands.

Read on.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 27, 2006 at 12:27 PM in Beer, Belgium, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

Juju beer

The nine-day Green Week Festival in Berlin, Germany’s most important trade fair, ended on Sunday with a spectacular exhibition by a Ghanaian who had showed up at the fair with ‘juju’ beer, served in a calabash.

Almost everyone, including some delegates from the European Union and the German Ministry of Agriculture, who turned up at the fair, was carried away by the exhibition of the Ghanaian, whose ‘juju’ beer had no alcoholic content, and yet was powerful enough to resist the minus eight degree temperature.

The beer, made with palm kernels, passion fruit and banana flavouring, had been named ‘juju’ (cult) because of its high boozing content.

The Ghanaian Chronicle reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 25, 2006 at 10:48 AM in Beer, Brewing , Germany, Ghana | Permalink

Beer and wine in Yemen

During the British Occupation in the southern part of Yemen, beer, wine, and other liquors, gained fame and spread like never before.

Twelve years ago, however, the National Brewing Company, or the Seera beer factory, the first and only beer factory in Yemen, was burned to the ground by northern troops during the North-South civil car. Every bottle of beer was broken.  Tough measures were taken to ensure that alcohol would never play a role in the country’s future.

As luck would have it, though, things didn't exactly work out that way.

Read more.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 24, 2006 at 12:37 PM in Alcohol (general), Beer, Brewing , Wine, Yemen | Permalink

Brewer to start Vietnam beer venture

SABMiller is to open a brewery in Vietnam in joint venture with the country's largest dairy company as the world's third largest brewer establishes its first foothold in one of the fastest growing beer markets in Asia. The London-based brewer and Vinamilk will invest $45m in an operation that would start making half a million hectolitres of beer by the first half of 2007.

The Financial Times reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 14, 2006 at 02:03 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Vietnam | Permalink

Czech brewery claims win in trademark spat

Czech brewery Budejovicky Budvar claimed victory in Finland Thursday over beer giant Anheuser-Busch Cos. Inc. in the latest round of their ongoing global trademark dispute.

The New York Times reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 6, 2006 at 01:31 PM in Beer, Brewing , Czech Republic | Permalink

Microbreweries in the 1990s (Article)

Steven M. Schnell and Joseph F. Reese, "Microbreweries as Tools of Local Identity," Journal of Cultural Geography 21/1 (2003): 45-69.

Posted by David Fahey on December 25, 2005 at 09:26 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Brewing in the Isle of Man (Thesis)

Tim Crumplin, "Business and Community in the Isle of Man: The Cases of Banking and Brewing, 1840-1939" (Ph.D. thesis, University of Liverpool, 2003).

Posted by David Fahey on December 12, 2005 at 07:59 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Beer on the Isle of Man (Book)

Tim Crumplin and Roger Rawcliffe, A Time of Manx Cheer: A History of the Licensed Trade in the Isle of Man (2002). Focus on the firm of Heron & Brearley since 1850. Publisher unknown. Available from Brewery History Society.

Posted by David Fahey on December 12, 2005 at 07:56 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Small British Breweries (Booklet)

Nicholas Redman, A History of the Society of Independent Brewers, 1880-2005 (2005). Apparently published by the British Guild of Beer Writers. Available for sale from the Brewery History Society.

Posted by David Fahey on December 12, 2005 at 07:53 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Beauties and beer: a Peruvian tale

It sounds like part of a bad movie plot, but Chicago scientists have found ruins of an A.D. 600 Peruvian brewery run by beautiful 'brewmistresses.' The archeologists say the brewery in southern Peru was probably staffed by women selected for their 'beauty or nobility,' the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

But the newspaper also noted one mark of feminine loveliness at the time was a sloped forehead. Patrick Ryan Williams, a Chicago Field Museum curator, said the beer, made with corn and pepper berry, was called chicha, and was at 'the heart' of the Wari culture. Read more.

Posted by Matthew McKean on November 15, 2005 at 12:56 PM in Beer, Brewing , Peru | Permalink

What better way to reward a group of athletes?

A major Czech brewery has offered 160 litres of beer, the average yearly consumption of each citizen, to each member of the Czech national football squad irrespective of whether the team beats Norway to qualify for the 2006 World Cup in Germany.

"We want to recognise the achievements of the team in one of the most difficult qualifying groups for the World Cup," said a brewery spokesman. "The offer is equivalent to a year's supply of beer," he added.

Players will only be able to take up the offer after the second leg of the play-off match against Norway in Prague on November 16, he added. The first leg is in Norway on Saturday.

The Australian reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on November 11, 2005 at 02:07 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Czech Republic | Permalink

'I'll have a Seriously Bad Elf and an order of wings, please'

Connecticut residents will be able to toast to their health this holiday season with a bottle of Seriously Bad Elf. The state Department of Consumer Protection announced Tuesday it would approve the sale of Seriously Bad Elf ale in Connecticut despite earlier concerns that the beer’s label might appeal to children. The department determined that although state regulations bar alcohol advertising with images that might entice kids, including images associated with Santa Claus, the regulations do not apply to beer labels. The Boston Herald reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on November 8, 2005 at 11:48 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Licensing and Legislation, Wine | Permalink

Brewers of NE England (Book)

Brian Bennison, The Brewers and Breweries of North-Eastern England: A Historical Guide (Longfield: Brewery History Society, 2004).  Pages vi, 146.

Posted by David Fahey on November 3, 2005 at 11:45 AM in Brewing | Permalink

U.S. Brewing (ADHS paper)

Amy Mittlerman, "Death and Rebirth: The United States Brewing Industry, 1983-2002," American Historical Association annual meeting, Philadelphia, January 2006.

Posted by David Fahey on October 29, 2005 at 03:55 PM in Brewing | Permalink

London Brewers and Drinking Fountains (ADHS Paper)

Vanessa Taylor (Birkbeck College, London), "'Smelling of the Ale-Vat': Philanthropic London Brewers and the Mid-Victorian Drinking Fountain Movement," American Historical Association annual meeting, Philadelphia, January 2006.

Posted by David Fahey on October 29, 2005 at 03:48 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Told you: light beer is garbage

According to a news report in Monday's Denver Post, Coors Brewing Co. uses waste from the beer production process to produce approximately 1.5 million gallons of ethanol, which is then sold in the wholesale market.

Coors, which partners with area engineering firm Merrick & Company to produce the alternative fuel, said they plan to build another ethanol facility due to the success of the program, according to the paper.

"We've basically taken a waste stream and turned it into a revenue stream," Steven Wagner, the Merrick vice president who oversees the ethanol project, told the paper.

CNN Money reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on October 25, 2005 at 01:01 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Stone Age Beer

It's one thing to re-create a 9,000-year-old brew. It's another thing to drink it. Discover reports.

Posted by Matthew McKean on October 20, 2005 at 01:24 PM in Beer, Brewing | Permalink

Breweries of Wisconsin (Book)

Jerold W. Apps, Breweries of Wisconsin, 2nd ed. (Madison: University of Wisconsin, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on October 15, 2005 at 02:17 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Labor Relations in German-American Breweries (Article)

Timothy J. Holian, "'Des Arbeiters Starke': German-American Brewery Owner-Worker Relations, 1860-1920," Yearbook of German-American Studies 38 (2003): 205-220.

Posted by David Fahey on October 13, 2005 at 08:37 PM in Brewing , Germany, United States | Permalink

Beer-making monks seek 'piety, not profit'...they also have a variety of bridges to sell you

Inside the sanctuary of the abbey of St. Sixtus of Westvleteren in Brussels is a beer lover's dream and a businessman's nightmare.

Piety, not profit, is what these monks seek. The St. Sixtus monks break every rule in Business 101 except attention to quality. And therein may lie the secret of their success in brewing a beer that some rank among the world's best and that is so hard to get there's a black market for it. Read more at USA Today here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on October 6, 2005 at 02:00 PM in Beer, Belgium, Brewing , Religion | Permalink

Micro-breweries booming

Reuters reports (14 September 2005) from London that new breweries are booming, with the number of start-ups almost doubling over the last year, the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) said on Wednesday. "There is no ‘real ale crisis'," said Roger Protz, editor of CAMRA's Good Beer Guide, which lists a record 80 new breweries in its 2006 edition, most of them micro-breweries. Read more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on September 15, 2005 at 11:52 AM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

Today's hurricane relief is brought to you by the following sponsors...

The Associated Press reports (2 September 2005) that beer giant Anheuser-Busch says it has begun supplying cans of fresh drinking water to Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana. It has pledged two and a-half million cans a week as long as necessary. To supply the much-needed water, it is converting brewery operations in Houston and Cartersville, Georgia. Like other large corporations, it has pledged a million dollars to the American Red Cross for hurricane relief. The maker of Budweiser and Michelob says it will also make its large truck fleet, based at 12 domestic breweries, available to help the Red Cross ship emergency supplies such as generators, food and clothing.

Posted by Matthew McKean on September 6, 2005 at 11:47 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Breweries large and small respond to flat market...with caffeine beer

The Miami Herald reports (28 August 2005) that a couple of breweries, one of them large and one of them small, made announcements recently that perfectly illustrate the state of the American beer business. Anheuser-Busch, the brewery that churns out more than 3 billion gallons of what they insist is beer, unveiled Tilt, a raspberry-flavored malt beverage with caffeine. Tilt is designed for a target audience, ages 21 to 27, transitioning from the end of their workday to their night out. In the past year, Anheuser-Busch has also issued something called B-to-the-E, which features berries and caffeine with a ginseng kicker, and Budweiser Select. Of Bud Select, industry magazine Modern Brewery Age said, "If no-aftertaste, low cal, low carb is the future of beer, then it is a bleak future, indeed.'' Read more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on August 31, 2005 at 10:37 AM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Caffeine, United States | Permalink

Beer-making monks' prayers answered

MSNBC reports (25 August 2005) that a German monastery, famous for its beer, is safe from a massive flood spilling from the Danube River. Monks knew a massive flood could destroy the famous church, full of Baroque masterpieces, and even worse, the jewel that attracts many of its half million visitors a year: its beer. Since 1050, Weltenburg monks have been making beer to make money. These days, Weltenburg beer has become one of Germany’s favorite brews, making the abbey a must-see stop on any Danube River tour. Read more.

Posted by Matthew McKean on August 26, 2005 at 12:15 PM in Beer, Brewing , Germany | Permalink

Brewers Society records at Warwick

Around 2001 the University of Warwick (Coventry) Modern Records Centre acquired from the Brewers and Licensed Retailers Association a large body of UK alcohol trades records, particularly that of the Brewers Society and the organizations that had merged into it.

Posted by David Fahey on August 22, 2005 at 10:40 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Russia's thirst for lager cheers S&N

The Times reports (10 August 2005) that Russia's growing thirst for lager helped Scottish & Newcastle, Britain’s biggest brewer, to overcome lacklustre conditions in Western Europe and book an 8.7 per cent rise in interim pre-tax profits to £163 million. Strong growth in sales of Baltika, Europe’s second-largest beer brand behind Heineken, resulted in a sharp rise in profits at Baltic Beverages Holding (BBH), S&N’s Russian joint venture with Carlsberg of Denmark. Operating profits for the first half of the year at BBH increased by 32 per cent to £49 million as sales jumped by 24 per cent to £280 million. Read more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on August 15, 2005 at 12:42 PM in Beer, Brewing , Denmark, Russia | Permalink

Start the night with caffeinated malt beverage

PRNewswire reports (8 August 2005) that Anheuser-Busch is kicking off the phased, nationwide launch of Tilt, a new, innovative malt beverage featuring an assorted blend of caffeine, guarana, and ginseng. This "5 p.m. after-work drink," which offers a bold berry-flavor, is part of the emerging, flavored caffeinated malt beverage category and an ideal choice for those seeking something new to help start the night.

Posted by Matthew McKean on August 9, 2005 at 02:18 PM in Beer, Brewing , Caffeine | Permalink

Miller Brewing Family (Book)

Tim John, The Miller Beer Barons: The Frederick J. Miller Family and Its Brewery (Oregon, Wisconsin: Badger Books, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on July 29, 2005 at 08:51 PM in Brewing | Permalink

UK Brewing, 1950-1990 (Book)

Alistair Mutch, Strategic and Organizational Change: From Production to Retailing in UK Brewing 1950-1990 (New York: Routledge, forthcoming 2006).

 

Posted by David Fahey on July 28, 2005 at 07:33 PM in Brewing | Permalink

UK Beer and Brewing (bibliography)

Byrne, Al. Guinness Times: My Days in the World’s Most Famous Brewery. Dublin: Town House and Country House, 1999.

Cottingham, Ann. The Hostelries of Henley; or, An Account of the Alehouses, Beerhouses, Breweries, Hostelries, Hotels, Inns, Malthouses, Public Houses, Taverns and Typpling Houses in the Town of Henley on Thames. Shiplake: A. Cottingham, 2000.
Crompton, Gerald. “’Well-Intentioned Meddling’: The Beer Orders and the British Brewing Industry.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 160-175.
Cusack, J. “The History of the Malting and Brewing Industry in Carlow.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 86 (2000), 272-274.
Donnachie, Ian. “Following the Flag: Scottish Brewers and Beers in Imperial and International Markets, 1850-1939.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 123-141.
Donnachie, Ian. Review of Lynn Pearson, British Breweries: An Architectural History (London: Hambledon Press, 1999). The Annual Journal of the Scottish Brewing Archive 2 (2000), 37-38.
Easdown, Martin, and Eamonn Rooney. Tales from the Tap Room: An Anthology of Folkestone’s Public Houses & Breweries. Seabrook: Marlin, 2000.
Eyles, Graham. “Some Notes on the 19th Century Breweries in the Bury/Radcliffe District.” Brewery History 99 (2000), 36-39.
Fitch, Nigel. The Incorporated Brewers Benevolent Society: A Personal View. London: Brewers’ Guild Publications Ltd., 1999.
Flett, Iain. “The Maltmen Incorporation of Dundee.” The Annual Journal of the Scottish Brewing Archive 1 (1998), 24-25. [Describes the records of the Maltmen Incorporation, a 400 year old brewing guild, available for inspection at the city archives in Dundee, Scotland.]
Furze, C. “The Family Brewery in Whitechapel.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 38.
Gourvish, Terry. “Diffusion of Brewing Technology since 1900: Change and the Consumer.” History of Technology 18 (1996), 139-148.
Gray, Iain. “Sources for Brewing History in North-East Scotland.” The Annual Journal of the Scottish Brewing Archive 2 (2000), 28-30.
Guinness, Michele. The Guinness Spirit: Brewers and Bankers, Ministers and Missionaries. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1999.
Gutzke, David W. “Gender, Class, and Public Drinking in Britain During the First World War.” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 291-319. [Abstract: “During World War I respectable upper working-class and lower middle-class women, who had shunned public drinking for almost a century, began patronizing the pub in unprecedented numbers. In threatening the pre-war gender status quo, they provoked intense opposition from authorities who seemed committed to a counterattack once the war ended. Attracting such women’s custom was a major incentive for brewers espousing the reform of the public house, ensuring that a wartime trend become a post-war tradition. Yet unreformed slum pubs, unregenerate regional subcultures, unco-operative magistrates, and unsympathetic feminists all prevented the attainment of full equality in public drinking in the inter-war era” (291).]
Harper, William T. Origins and Rise of the British Distillery. Lewiston, New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 1999.
Hulatt, Lewis. “Fall of House of Ushers.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 51-58.
Hyde, Neal. “Brewing was a Way of Life: The Story of Hydes’ Anvil Brewery.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 59-64.
Jones, Michael. Time, Gentlemen, Please!: Early Brewery Posters in the Public Record Office. Kew: PRO Publications with Vaux Breweries Ltd, 1997.
Millns, Tony. “The British Brewing Industry, 1945-1995.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 142-159.
Morris, Derek. “Two Early Breweries in Mile End Old Town, Stepney, 1700-1780.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 18-28.
o’ Drisceoil, Diarmuid and o’Drisceoil, Donal. The Murphy’s Story: The History of Lady Well’s Brewery, Cork. Cork: Murphy’s Brewery, 1997.
O’Halloran, Michael. Old Goulburn Brewery: The Brewing Process. Goulburn, New South Wales: M. O’Halloran, 1995.
Osborne, K.W. The Brewers of Cromwell’s County: A Directory of Commercial Breweries in Huntingdonshire. Wellingborough: K. Osborne, 1999.
Parry, David Lloyd. “Beverley’s Eagle Brewery, Wakefield 1861-1967.” Brewery History 99 (2000), 13-18.
Patrick, Amber. “Maltings  Update 2001.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 80-86.
Pearson, Lynn F. British Breweries: An Architectural History. London: Hambledon, 1999.
Phillips, J. and M. French. “The Pure Beer Campaign and Arsenic Poisoning, 1896-1903.” Rural History: Economy, Society, Culture 9:2 (1998), 195.
Redman, Nicholas. “A History of Fenwick & Co, Sunderland’s Other Brewery.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 86 (2000), 262-269.
Redman, Nicholas. “Beer Bottling 100 Years Ago.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 85 (November 1999), 572.
Redman, Nicholas. “General Haynau’s Visit to Barclay & Perkins Brewery in 1850.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 86 (2000), 168-169.
Redman, Nicholas. “Last Brew at Chiswell Street.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 82 (April 1996), 185.
Redman, Nicholas. “Louis Pasteur and the Brewing Industry.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 81 (September 1995), 371.
Redman, Nicholas. “Magor Brewery 1979-1995: Manages an Exceptional Reservoir of Material at Chiswell Street.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 85 (August 1995), 403.
Redman, Nicholas. “Whitbread at Chiswell Street, 1749-1995.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 81 (June 1995), 239.
Redman, Nicholas. “Whitbread at Chiswell Street, 1750 2000.” Brewery History 99 (2000), 40-46.
Redman, Nicholas. “Whitbread at Chiswell Street, 1750 2000.” The Brewer: Brewers’ Guild Journal 86 (2000), 120-123.
Richards, John. “The Wordsley Brewery & Company Limited, Wordsley, Staffordshire.” Brewery History 99 (2000), 7-12.
Saunders, Pat. “Henty & Constable Ltd: Westgate Brewery, Chichester.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 65-80.
Shepherd, Cliff. Brewery Railways of Burton on Trent. Guisborough: Industrial Railway Society, 1996. [History of industrial railroads and the brewing industry in Burton upon Trent.]
Smith, Denis. “Two East London Breweries: Interviews Recorded and Transcribed.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 31-37.
Stapleton, Barry. Gales: A Study in Brewing, Business, and Family History. Brookfield, Vermont: Ashgate, 2000.
Talbot, Philip A. “Accounting for Taste: Costing the Price of a Pint Before the Great War.” Brewery History 99 (2000), 19-35.
Talbot, Philip A. “The Bass Rifle Volunteers of the 19th Century.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 9-12.
Unsigned. “History of Ind Coope Romford Brewery.” Brewery History 102 (Winter 2000), 39-50.
Wilson, R.G. “The Changing Taste for Beer in Victorian Britain.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 93-104.
Bennett, Judith M. Ale, Beer and Brewsters in England: Women’s Work in a Changing World, 1300-1600. New York: Oxford Univeristy Press, 1996.
Burnett, John. Liquid Pleasures: A Social History of Drinks in Modern Britain. New York: Routledge, 1999. [Includes chapters on water, milk, tea, coffee, soft drinks, beer, wine, and spirits.]
Gwyther, Matthew. “End of the Hereditary Beerage.” Management Today (February 1999), 40-47. [On the decline of family breweries in England.]
Morton, Timothy, ed. Radical Food: The Culture and Politics of Eating and Drinking, 1790-1820. Volume 1: Ethics and Politics; Volume 2: Culture and Society; Volume 3: Health and Diet. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. [Anthology of primary materials; includes William Fox, “An Address to the People of Great Britain, on the Utility of Refraining from the Use of West India Sugar and Rum” (1791), Frederick Accum, “A Treatise on Adulterations of Food, and Culinary Poisons, Exhibiting the Fraudulent Sophistications of Bread, Beer, Wine, Spiritous Liquors, Tea, Coffee, Cream, Confectionery, Vinegar, Mustard, Pepper, Cheese, Olive Oil, Pickles, and Other Articles Employed in Domestic Economy. And Methods of Detecting them” (1820), Robert MacNish, “The Anatomy of Drunkenness” (1827), and Thomas Trotter, “A View of the Nervous Temperament” (1807), besides a number of items on abstinence from meat].
Mutch, Alistair. “From Landlord to Manager: Change in Beer Retailing 1890-1980.” Paper presented to the Association of Business Historians conference, South Bank University, September 1999. Last accessed November 2000. <http://www.nbs.ntu.ac.uk/staff/mutchaf/abh.htm>.
Sturges, Paul. “Beer and Books: Michael Thomas Bass, Derby Public Library, and the Philanthropy of the Beerage.” Libraries & Culture 31:2 (1996), 247-271.
Thayer, Hewitt S. “Distilling Spirits and Regulating Subjects: Whiskey and Beer in Romantic Britain.” Eire-Ireland: A Journal of Irish Studies 30:3 (Fall 1995), 7-13.
Warner, Jessica. “The Naturalization of Beer and Gin in Early Modern England.” Contemporary Drug Problems 24 (Summer 1997), 373-402.

Posted by Jon Miller on July 24, 2005 at 11:28 PM in Beer, Brewing , Drinking Spaces, United Kingdom | Permalink

U.S. beer (bibliography)

Banham, Russ. Coors: A Rocky Mountain Legend. Lyme, Connecticut: Greenwich Publishing Group, Inc., 1998.

Baron, Stanley. Brewed In America: A History of Beer & Ale in the United States. 1962; rpt. North Stratford, New Hampshire: Ayer Company Publishers, 1998.
Barr, Andrew. Review of Philip Van Munching, Beer Blast: The Inside Story of the Brewing Industry’s Bizarre Battles for Your Money (New York: Times Business, 1997). The Social History of Alcohol Review 38-39 (1999), 44-47.
Baum, Dan. Citizen Coors: An American Dynasty. New York: William Morrow, 2000.
Blum, Peter H. Brewed in Detroit: Breweries and Beers since 1830. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1999.
Brown, Charles E. “The Brewing Industry.” In James P. Leary, ed., Wisconsin Folklore (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1998), 80-84. [On the lexicology of beer brewing in Wisconsin.]
Bryson, Lew. Pennsylvania Breweries. Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books, 1998.
Budnick, Jason J. “The Cold Spring Brewing Company, 1874-1997: A History and Analysis of a Regional Brewery.” M.A. Thesis, St. Cloud State University, 1998.
Cecil, Sam K. The Evolution of the Bourbon Whiskey Industry in Kentucky. Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing, 1999.
Flack, W. “American Microbreweries and Neolocalism: ‘Ale-ing’ for a Sense of Place.” Journal of Cultural Geography 16:2 (1997), 37 53.
Gaston, Kay Baker. “George Dickel Tennessee Sour Mash Whiskey: The Story behind the Label.” Tennessee Historical Quarterly 57:2 (1998), 150-167.
Gettelman, Nancy Moore. The A. Gettelman Brewing Company: One Hundred and Seven Years of a Family Brewery in Milwaukee. Milwaukee: Procrustes Press, 1995.
Guetig, Peter R., and Conrad D. Selle. Louisville Breweries: A History of the Brewing Industry in Louisville, Kentucky, New Albany and Jeffersonville, Indiana. Louisville: Mark Skaggs Press, 1995.
Hajicek, Robert, and Michael Hajicek. “Minnesota Breweries.” Breweriana Collector 97 (Spring 1997), 1-30.
Heilman, Robert A. Brewers and Breweries: A Brief History of the Brewing Industry of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. Lebanon, Pennsylvania: Lebanon County Historical Society, 1997.
Hendrix, Scott N. “Made in Germany: Brewing in Cleveland, 1857-1902.” Research paper, Cleveland State University, 1995. [Forty-two page paper bound and held at the Western Reserve Historical Society Library; on the history of German brewers in Cleveland.]
Holian, Timothy J. Over the Barrel: The Brewing History and Beer Culture of Cincinnati. St. Joseph, Missouri: Sudhaus Press, 2000.
Janosov, Robert A. Cold and Gold from the Poconos: A History of the Stegmaier Brewing Company, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Nanticoke, Pennsylvania: Tres Canis, 1997.
Kerr, K. Austin. “The American Brewing Industry, 1865-1920.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 176-192.
Land, Stephen, executive producer, Tom Robertson, writer, and Dan Chandler, narrator. Brewed in America. Videocassette. A&E Home Video, 1997.
Lisheron, Mark. “The Secret History of Women Brewers.” Zymurgy: Journal of the American Homebrewers Association 22:2 (March 1, 1999), 22.
Lobbig, David. “Adam Lemp’s Taste for Beer.” Gateway Heritage: Quarterly Journal of the Missouri Historical Society 20:2 (1999), 84-88. [Biography of Lemp, successful St. Louis brewer of lager beer.]
Lockhart, Bill. “From ‘Chasers’ to the Family Trade: Some Early El Paso Soda Bottlers.” Password 44:4 (1999), 173-180. [Describes the business of soda bottling in El Paso, Texas from 1881 to 1917.]
Lonto, Jeff R. Legend of the Brewery: A Brief History of the Minneapolis Brewing Heritage. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Studio Z-7 Publishing, 1998.
Manning, Michael, Sarah Smith, and Eric Chernoff. “North Carolina Moonshine: A Survey of Moonshine Culture, 1900-1930” [website]. Last updated November 1997; last accessed November 2000. <http://www.ibiblio.org/moonshine/index.html>.
Maxwell, H. James and Bob Sullivan. Hometown Beer: A History of Kansas City’s Breweries. Kansas City: Omega Innovative Marketing, 1999.
McWilliams, James E. “Brewing Beer in Massachusetts Bay 1640 1690.” New England Quarterly 71:4 (December 1998), 543-569.
Miller, Carl H. Breweries of Cleveland. Cleveland: Schnitzelbank Press, 1998.
Morris, Danny, and Jeff Johnson. Richmond Beers: A Directory of the Breweries and Bottlers of Richmond, Virginia. 2nd ed. Colorprint International, 2000.
Muehl, Siegmar. “Isidor Bush and the Bushberg Vineyards of Jefferson County.” Missouri Historical Review 94:1 (1999), 42-58.
Musson, Robert A. Brewing Beer in the Rubber City: A History of Akron’s Brewing Industry from 1845 to 1997. Akron, Ohio: R.A. Musson, 1997.
Nelson, Derek. Moonshiners, Bootleggers, and Rumrunners. Osceola, Wisconsin: Motorbooks International, 1995.
Powell, Jack Allen. A Dying Art. Catskill, New York: Press-Tige Publishing, 1996. [On the history of illicit distilling in southwest Virginia.]
Powell, Stephen R. Rushing the Growler: A History of Brewing in Buffalo. Buffalo, New York: Apogee Design, 1996.
Purcell, Aaron D. “Bourbon to Bullets: Louisville’s Distillery Industry during World War II, 1941-1945.” The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 96 (Winter 1998), 61-87.
Raubvogel, David. Brooklyn’s Golden Age of Brewing, 1890-1900. Brooklyn, New York: David Raubvogel, 1999.
Redman, Rick, and Virginia McKenna. Last Call for the Narragansett Brewery. Colorado Springs, Colorado: American Breweriana Association, 1999.
Reeder, Carolyn. Moonshiner’s Son. New York: Avon Books, 1995. [Twelve-year-old Tom Higgins is proud to help his father continue the long-held family tradition in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia during Prohibition, until Amy, a pretty preacher’s daughter, challenges the way of life.]
Roberts, Guy M. Bottom of the Barrel. G.M. Roberts, 1997. [On tramps and illicit distilling in Pound, Virginia.]
Saurman, David S. “Efficiency Effects of Exclusive Territories: Evidence from the Indiana Beer Market.” Economic Inquiry 34:3 (1996), 597-615.
Schmitt, Robert C. “Hawaii’s Beers and Brewers.” Hawaiian Journal of History 31 (1997), 143-150.
Selle, Conrad. “Conrad Selle’s Local Brewing History: Louisville & Southern Indiana.” Last modified September 2000; Last accessed November 2000. <http://www.fossils.org/BeerHistory.htm>. [On Kentucky Common Beer, brewer and poet Hew Ainslie, and Kentucky’s law banning beer- and wine-of-the-month shipments.]
Sharpe, Clifford C. “The Spearman Brewing Company.” Pensacola History Illustrated 5:2 (1997), 1-4.
Skilnik, Bob. The History of Beer and Brewing in Chicago, 1833-1978. St. Paul, Minnesota: Pogo Press, 1999.
Slosberg, Pete. Beer for Pete’s Sake: The Wicked Adventures of a Brewing Maverick. Boulder, Colorado: Siris Books, 1998.
Smith, Gregg. Beer in America: The Early Years, 1587-1840: Beer’s Role in the Settling of America and the Birth of a Nation. Boulder, Colorado: Siris Books, 1998. [Gregg Smith has also published a great number of articles on beer history on the internet. Too numerous to print here individually, these articles are available through the Real Beer Page at <http://www.realbeer.com/library/authors/smith-g/>. This collection includes seven articles on brewing in colonial North America; five articles on New York beer history (“Consumers Brewing Company,” “The Doelger Breweries,” “The Story of George Ehret,” “Fraunces Tavern,” and “New York Beer History: Part 2”); three articles on Chicago beer history (“The John A. Huck Brewing Company,” “Early Chicago Brewing,” and “Chicago Beer Riots”); three articles on Pennsylvania beer history (“Colonial Philadelphia,” “The Brewery of William Massey,” and “The Frederick Lauer Story”); four articles on Milwaukee beer history (“The Fred Miller Story,” “Pabst: A Blue Ribbon Beer,” and two articles titled “Milwaukee’s Big Three”); nine miscellaneous articles (including “The Golden Age of Taverns,” “Beer as an Early Mixed Drink,” and “Beer in the Civil War”); numerous articles on beer festivals, pub crawling, beer tasting, and home brewing; and brewery reviews.]
Smith, Sean D. “Moonshining in Tennessee, 1876-1900.” M.A. Thesis, Vanderbilt University, 1995. [History of liquor laws and illicit distilling in Appalachia.]
Stack, Martin Heidegger. “Liquid Bread: An Examination of the American Brewing Industry, 1865-1940.” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Notre Dame, 1998.
Thomas, Kara Amis. The Coors: A Family Brew. Videocassette. New York: A & E Home Video, 1997.
Troesken, Werner. “Exclusive Dealing and the Whiskey Trust, 1890-1895.” The Journal of Economic History 58:3 (1998), 755-779.
Van Wieren, Dale. American Breweries II. West Point, Pennsylvania: Eastern Coast Breweriana Association, 1995. [Revised edition of American Breweries (1984) by Donald Bull, Manfred Friedrich, Robert Gottschalk.]
Weinhardt, Don, and George William Fisher. A Historical Guide to Long Island Soda, Beer & Mineral Water Bottles & Bottling Companies 1840-1970: Nassau, Suffolk, Brooklyn, Queens. 2nd ed. Bayport, New York: Long Island Antique Bottle Association, 1999.
Williams, Frank B., Jr. “893 Barrels of Jack Daniel’s Old No. 7: The Troubles and Trials of Lem Motlow, 1923-1930.” Tennessee Historical Quarterly 58:1 (1999), 34-51.
Wimberg, Robert J. Cincinnati Breweries. 2nd ed. Cincinnati, Ohio: Ohio Book Store, 1997.
Wood, Donald F. American Beer Trucks. Osceola, Wisconsin: Motorbooks International, 1999.
YNO, William. Smoke in the Valley. Stockport, Ohio: Valley Enterprises, 1998. [Novel about coal mining and illicit distilling in Ohio.]

Posted by Jon Miller on July 15, 2005 at 03:04 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Brewing in Eastern Ohio (Book)

Robert A. Musson, Brewing Beer in the Buckeye State, vol. 1,  A History of the Brewing Industry in Eastern Ohio from 1808 to 2004 (Zepp, 2005).  Musson previously published a history of brewing in Akron, Ohio, called Beer in the Rubber City (1997).  Carl H. Miller wrote the prize-winning history called Brewers of Cleveland (Schnitzelbank, 1998) which told the story of the largest city in eastern Ohio.

Posted by David Fahey on July 5, 2005 at 04:49 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Newcastle Breweries (Thesis)

J.G. Nairn, Newcastle Breweries: Their History and Development (B. Arch., thesis, University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Department of Architecture, 2005).

Posted by David Fahey on June 29, 2005 at 01:55 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Birmingham Breweries (Book)

Joseph McKenna, Birmingham Breweries (Studley: Brewin Books, 2005).  Short book on history of breweries in Birmingham, England.

Posted by David Fahey on June 29, 2005 at 01:47 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Beer-drinking is in decline in developed countries

The Times Online reports (13 June 2005) that the shares of brewing companies with big and expanding businesses in emerging markets will perform better than those whose main markets remain in the developed world, according to new research from Goldman Sachs, the US investment bank. The bank predicts that the shares of three global brewing groups — InBev, SABMiller and Molson Coors — will outperform brewers whose main businesses are in developed countries. Beer-drinking is in decline in developed countries, where populations are ageing. Read more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 26, 2005 at 05:06 PM in Beer, Brazil, Brewing , China, India, Russia | Permalink

Lawmakers seek to create New York beer trail

Newsday reports (19 June 2005) that lawmakers in Albany are encouraging residents and visitors alike to enjoy a tall, cold one. A bill making its way through the Legislature aims to create a New York state beer trail, similar to those the wine industry has successfully used to attract millions of oenophiles to the Finger Lakes, Hudson Valley and eastern Long Island. Sponsors of the legislation say it will highlight the reemergence of breweries in New York and help brewers cash-in on the popularity of their oatmeal stouts, India pale ales and bitters. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 23, 2005 at 09:14 AM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Breweries gloom as sales slide

This is London reports (20 June 2005) that the full extent of the recent downturn in sales of beer through pubs, clubs, off-licences and supermarkets has been revealed in figures obtained by Financial Mail. Confidential data drawn up by the British Beer & Pub Association show that in the three months to the end of April, the volume of beer, ale, lager and stout sold through what is known as the on-trade was about 4% lower than a year earlier. The amount of beer bought to drink at home has scarcely changed after increasing steadily for decades. Sales of beer as a whole have fallen gradually from a peak in the late Seventies. But the volume of lager has edged up as it has taken market share from ales and stouts. Read more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 20, 2005 at 12:33 PM in Beer, Brewing , Drinking Spaces, United Kingdom | Permalink

Post-World War II Purge of Danish Collaborators in Brewing Industry (Article)

Lizette Albaek Nielsen, "Vi Taller ikke Nogen, Son har Sympatiseret med Nazisterne: Udrensninger hos Bryggeriarbejderne efter Besaettelsen," Arbejderhistorie (2000), no. 3: 44-64.

Posted by David Fahey on June 17, 2005 at 10:08 AM in Brewing | Permalink

The historic Murree Brewery: the only beer-maker in Pakistan

Canada.com reports (13 June 2005) on Pakistan's Murree Brewery, which was established in 1861 to slake the thirst of British soldiers across the Indian subcontinent, lost much of its market when Pakistan won independence nearly 60 years ago, but still prospers today as the Islamic country's only licensed beer-maker. Despite a law that bars Muslims - about 97 per cent of Pakistan's 150 million people - from drinking alcohol, business is brisk. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 16, 2005 at 10:07 AM in Beer, Brewing , Pakistan | Permalink

India (bibliography)

Dutta, S.C. “History of Soma and other Spirituous Liquors of India.” Asian Agri-History 4:3 (2000), 203-220. [On the history of the divine liquor, soma, and other spirituous liquors that thrived in ancient India.]

These citations originally appeared in recent “Current Literature” sections of The Social History of Alcohol Review. Jon Miller and David Fahey compiled and edited them. They were also available on the Alcohol and Drugs History Society’s old website, http://athg.org.

Unterstein, K. “Him Heel Breweries Ltd.: A ‘German’ Brewery in India.” Brauwelt International No. 1 (1999), 56-58.

Jammi Naidu, S., and M.K. Misra. “Production and Consumption of Wild Date Palm Sap and Country Liquor in Two Tribal Village Ecosystems of Eastern Ghats of Orissa, India.” Bioresource Technology 63:3 (1998), 267-273.

Niimura, Yoko. “Igirisujin no ahen boekikan: Bengaru ahen ‘jiyu boeki’ ka ronso o chushin ni.” Rekishigaku Kenkyu 4 (1998), 18-34. [In Japanese; on Indian, British, and Chinese views of the opium trade in the 1860s and 1870s.]

Saldanha, Indra Munshi. “On Drinking and ‘Drunkenness’: History of Liquor in Colonial India.” Economic and Political Weekly 30:37 (1995), 2323-2332.

Library of Congress Office, New Delhi. Prohibition in India: Part 1. New Delhi: Library of Congress, Office, 1996. [Eleven microfiches, a collection of pamphlets published during 1962-1994.]

Unsigned. “Prohibition in India.” Economist 339:7971 (1996), 64.

Posted by Jon Miller on June 15, 2005 at 12:23 PM in Alcohol (miscellaneous), Beer, Brewing , Britain, China, India, Opium, Prohibition | Permalink

Grandpa's beer gets a brand new buzz

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports (11 June 2005) on "retro beers," brands that might bring to mind old men in ribbed undershirts, and which are now finding a new audience with the young. It worked for Pabst Blue Ribbon and now others are playing the same nostalgic chords. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 14, 2005 at 05:14 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing | Permalink

Europe (bibliography)

Behre, K.E. “The History of Beer Additives in Europe: A Review.” Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 8:1 (June 1, 1999), 35-48.

These citations originally appeared in recent “Current Literature” sections of The Social History of Alcohol Review. Jon Miller and David Fahey compiled and edited them. They were also available on the Alcohol and Drugs History Society’s old website, http://athg.org.

Landsteiner, Erich. “The Crisis of Wine Production in Late Sixteenth-Century Central Europe: Climatic Causes and Economic Consequences.” Climatic Change 43:1 (1999), 323-334.

Goodman, Jordan. “Jordan Excitantia: Or, How Enlightenment Europe Took to Soft Drugs.” In J. Goodman et al, eds., Consuming Habits: Drugs in History and Anthropology (New York: Routledge, 1995), 126-147.

Price, Jacob M. “Tobacco Use and Tobacco Taxation: A Battle of Interests in Early Modern Europe.” In J. Goodman et al, eds., Consuming Habits: Drugs in History and Anthropology (New York: Routledge, 1995), 165-185.

Smith, Woodruff D. “From Coffeehouse to Parlour: The Consumption of Coffee, Tea and Sugar in North-Western Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.” In J. Goodman et al, eds., Consuming Habits: Drugs in History and Anthropology (New York: Routledge, 1995), 148-165.

Gourvish, T.R. “Concentration, Diversity and Firm Strategy in European Brewing, 1945-1990.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 80-92.

Posted by Jon Miller on June 14, 2005 at 01:54 PM in Beer, Brewing , Coffee, Drinking Spaces, Drugs (general), France, Germany, Italy, Licensing and Legislation, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Tea, Tobacco, United Kingdom, Wine | Permalink

Germany (bibliography)

Dornbusch, Horst D. Prost! The Story of German Brewing. Boulder, Colorado: Brewers Publications, 1997.

Driscoll, Lawrence. “’Something Strange but Not Unpleasant’: Freud on Cocaine.” In Jane Lilienfeld and Jeffrey Oxford, eds., The Languages of Addiction (New York: St. Martin’s, 1999), 69-90.

These citations originally appeared in recent “Current Literature” sections of The Social History of Alcohol Review. Jon Miller and David Fahey compiled and edited them. They were also available on the Alcohol and Drugs History Society’s old website, http://athg.org. My apologies for any German characters that now appear incorrectly; these citations have been through multiple American word-processing programs and they often replace the correct characters with incorrect ones. If I knew German, I would correct them. --JM

Agreiter, M. “Das munchenbild in italienischen reisefuhrern [The image of Munich in Italian guidebooks].” Geographische Rundschau 52:3 (2000), 35-39.

Fonk, Genno. Altbier im Alltag: Biergeschichte vom Niederrhein. Duisburg: Mercator-Verlag, 1999.

Friedrich, Karin, ed. Festive Culture in Germany and Europe from the Sixteenth to the Twentieth Century. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000.

Greder, Werner. D’ Brusler Dorscht: die Geschichte der Bruchsaler Gaststutten und Brauereien. Ubstadt-Weiher: Verlag Regionalkultur, 1997. [In German; beer and restaurant history of Bruschal.]

Kurzweil, Peter and Pittrow, Lothar. “Die alkaloide des schlafmohns (papaver somniferum) im licht der pharmaziegeschichte. Teil 1: von der entdeckung des morphins bis zum heroin.” Geschichte der Pharmazie 47:4 (1995), 55-60. [In German; summarizes the research of German pharmacist Friedrich W. Serturner (1783-1841) to study the discovery of morphine and heroin.]

Landsteiner, Erich. “Household, Family, and Economy among Wine-Growing Peasants: The Case of Lower Austria in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century.” History of the Family 4:2 (1999), 113-135.

Matulina, Zeljka. “Alkoholische Getranke in kroatischen und deutschen Sprichwortern.” Proverbium: Yearbook of International Proverb Scholarship 16 (1999), 227-245.

Skorsetz, Ulrike. “Der Franzose Wechselt die Mode, Wir Deutschen Dagegen Wechseln die Wirtshauser: Wirtshauser und Bierkonsum aus der Sicht Deutscher Einwanderer im Neunzehnten Jahrhundert.” [The Frenchman switches fashion; we Germans, on the other hand, switch pubs: pubs and beer consumption from the view of German immigrants in the 19th century]. Yearbook of German-American Studies 31 (1996), 37-44.

Spode, Hasso. “Alkoholismusprevention in Deutschland. Vom ‘Kreuzzug wider den Branntwein’ zum ‘Aktionsplan Alkohol’.” In Aldo Legnaro and Arnold Schmieder, eds., Suchtwirtschaft (Munster, 1999), 41-68. [On the history of alcohol prevention in Germany].

Steffens, Rudolf. “Historische Weinbauterminologie in den Spatmittelalterlichen Mainzer Rechnungen aus Oberlahnstein.” Rheinische Vierteljahrsblatter 61 (1997), 225-270. [On the jargon of winemakers in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Oberlahnstein.]

Tlusty, B. Ann. “Gender and Alcohol in Early Modern Augsburg.” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 21-42. [Abstract: “The use of alcohol in early modern German society was prescribed by carefully structured norms. Drinking, even to the point of drunkenness, was not a sign of insecurity and ‘disorder’ as many historians have claimed. Rather, participation in drinking bouts helped define and enhance men’s social status. Drunkenness was therefore tolerated among men as long as they lived up to both the rules and norms of tavern society and the demands of their role as householders. Public drinking was a male prerogative, and drunkenness among women was universally condemned. Nonetheless, when alcohol abuse interfered with the household, women could and did deploy public power to impose limits on men’s drinking behaviour” (21).]

Tlusty, B. Ann. “Water of Life, Water of Death: the Controversy over Brandy and Gin in Early Modern Augsburg.” Central European History 31:1-2 (1998), 1-30.

Wassenberg, Karl. “Die kulturelle Genese der Sucht.” In Aldo Legnaro and Arnold Schmieder, eds., Suchtwirtschaft (Munster, 1999), 11-26. [On the disease model of addiction and Pietism.]

Posted by Jon Miller on June 14, 2005 at 01:45 PM in Austria, Beer, Brewing , Cocaine, Drinking Spaces, Germany, Heroin, Morphine, Temperance, Wine | Permalink

Beer puts 404 in hospital

News 24 reports (10 June 2005) from Moscow that at least 404 people, including 97 children, were rushed to hospital in a Hepatitis A outbreak in southwest Russia's Tver region, reported Itar-Tass news agency. A number of cases were also recorded in Moscow and the western province of Smolensk. The outbreak was believed to have been caused by a local beer, produced by the Rjevpivo brewery. Sales of the beer have been suspended in Moscow as a result.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 13, 2005 at 12:02 PM in Beer, Brewing , Russia | Permalink

Why the hell not?: sell beer in fast-food chains, says Stella brewer

The Independent reports (11 June 2005) that the maker of Stella Artois, InBev, the world's largest brewer, wants to see beer sold in thousands more outlets in the UK, such as McDonalds, Starbucks, cinemas, petrol stations and video rental shops. Despite fears that Britain is in the grips of a binge-drinking epidemic, with excessive alcohol consumption turning the UK's town centres into violent disorder zones, InBev believes alcohol should be available in many more high street locations. Find more here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 11, 2005 at 04:33 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces, United Kingdom | Permalink

Pub to set precedent for extended hours

This Is Herfordshire reports (12 May 2005) that all eyes in the brewing trade have turned to Barnet as the borough became the first in London to extend pub opening hours under controversial licensing laws. Barnet Council confirmed that Wetherspoons' Railway Bell pub in East Barnet Road, East Barnet, will be allowed to open for an extra 40 hours every week from November. The decision could have far-reaching ramifications for town centres in Barnet and nationally, with the result acting as a litmus test for other pubs, clubs, and restaurants. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 8, 2005 at 07:01 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces, Licensing and Legislation | Permalink

Beautiful Beer

Beautiful Beer is the beer and pub industry’s campaign to revitalise the image of beer. It is led by the British Beer and Pub Association, with the support of its member brewers and pub companies and other industry bodies. The campaign's website can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 8, 2005 at 12:22 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces, Licensing and Legislation | Permalink

Post-Prohibition Breweries (Article)

Martin Stack and Myles Gartland, "The Repeal of Prohibition and the Resurgence of the National Breweries: Productive Efficiency or Path Creation?," Managment Decision 43/3 (2005): 420-432.

Posted by David Fahey on June 6, 2005 at 09:30 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Ontario Government Supports Small Breweries

Canadian Newswire reports (2 June 2005) that the Ontario government is investing $5 million over five years to help small brewers across the province be successful in a competitive marketplace, Minister of Economic Development and Trade Joseph Cordiano announced. Find the full press release here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 6, 2005 at 04:14 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

Kirin enters third category beer arena

Just-Drinks.com reports (7 April 2005) that the Kirin Brewery is to follow Sapporo and Suntory into the so-called “third-category” beer market in Japan. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 3, 2005 at 07:01 PM in Beer, Brewing , Japan | Permalink

A taste of their own medicine?: drink company's bonding session 'ended in rampage'

The Times reported on 27 April 2005 that a bonding session for a drinks company at a luxury hotel in Scotland ended in a drunken rampage with staff threatening to attack their colleagues and making sexual advances, an employment tribunal heard. The weekend away for members of Diageo, the world’s biggest drinks group which sells Guinness and Smirnoff vodka, also led to one employee’s suspension and another staff member making allegations of sexual discrimination. The impact of binge-drinking at Diageo formed the basis of allegations of a former secretary who claims she was unfairly dismissed from her £32,000-a-year job. Find the ironical full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 3, 2005 at 09:44 AM in Alcohol (miscellaneous), Brewing , Scotland, Vodka | Permalink

Beer and wine do make a heady mix

The Australian reports (30 May 2005) that if Lion Nathan chief executive officer Robert Murray had been in charge of Foster's, he would not have bought Southcorp. He believes that while the beer and spirits business have a close correlation, wine is a completely different market and historically mass-marketing wine companies have not produced good returns on the capital employed. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on June 2, 2005 at 04:05 PM in Advertising, Australia, Beer, Brewing , Wine | Permalink

Brewers' Company apprentices (Book)

Clifford Reginald Webb, ed., Brewers' Company 1531-1695: abstracted and indexed by  Cliff Webb [London livery company apprenticeship registers, 36] (London, Society of Genealogists Enterprises, 2001).

Posted by David Fahey on May 30, 2005 at 02:06 PM in Brewing | Permalink

The names of some top breweries may surprise you

The Fontana Herald News reports (26 May 2005) on the state of the beer industry in the United States. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 26, 2005 at 03:23 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Denmark (articles)

Boje, Per, and Hans Chr. Johansen. “The Danish Brewing Industry After 1880: Entrepreneurs, Market Structure and Technology.” In R.G. Wilson and T.R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 59-74.

Eriksen, Sidsel. “Temperance from Below: The Birth of a ‘Counter-Culture.’” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 209-235. [Abstract: “A study of the Thisted Abstinence Society indicates that the old temperance movement in Denmark was an organization of socially vulnerable people. The author explains how the ‘middle-class’ character of temperance ideology developed as an ambitious strategy for its members’ own survival in the modern society - a strategy which formed the background for the ideas of prohibitionism as means to save society” (209).]

These citations originally appeared in recent “Current Literature” sections of The Social History of Alcohol Review. Jon Miller and David Fahey compiled and edited them. They were also available on the Alcohol and Drugs History Society’s old website, http://athg.org.

Posted by Jon Miller on May 23, 2005 at 10:48 AM in Brewing , Denmark, Prohibition, Temperance | Permalink

Ganesha label on beer bottle

Rediff.com reports (19 May 2005) that an Indian-American law student, offended by the depiction of Hindu god Ganesha on a bottle of beer in the US, is suing the beer company for 'hurting the sentiments of Hindus worldwide'. Though Lost Coast Brewery has said it will withdraw the label, Brij Dhir, a Golden Gate University law student and a licensed attorney in Mumbai, said he is seeking damages worth $ 1 billion from the company. Dhir, who hails from Brentwood, said the company's Indica India Pale Ale label showed Ganesh holding a beer in one of his arms and another in his trunk. "How can you show a god in such a way?" Dhir asked. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 22, 2005 at 12:45 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , India, Religion, United States | Permalink

Canada (bibliography)

Allen, Max, and Wendy Harker. Gather Beneath the Banner: Voices of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Toronto: Museum for Textiles, 1999.

Anstead, Christopher J. “Hegemony and Failure: Orange Lodges, Temperance Lodges, and Respectability in Victorian Ontario.” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 163-188. [Abstract: “Fraternal orders multiplied in late nineteenth-century Ontario, yet two prominent types of orders - the Loyal Order Association and the various temperance orders - did not share in this general growth. Instead, both were plagued by repeated urban failure. An examination of local events in two small Ontario towns brings these patterns into stark relief. Unlike other secret societies, neither Orange nor temperance orders forged an enduring link with the emerging hegemonic force in Victorian Ontario, the urban-centered middle class. In the case of the Orange order, this arose not from weakness, but from rank-and-file resistance to the dictates of ‘respectability.’ By contrast, the temperance orders, early vehicles of the respectable world view, were abandoned as the Victorian middle class sought cultural dominion through the construction of a wide consensus” (163).]

Bowering, Ian. Brewing in Formosa: 125 Years of Tradition. Burnstown, Ontario: General Store Publishing House, 1995. [History of breweries and the brewing industry in Formosa, Ontario, with especial focus on the history of the Algonquin Brewing Company.]

Bunbury, Dan. “Safe Haven for the Poor? Depositors and the Government Savings Bank in Halifax, 1832-1867.” Acadiensis 24:2 (1995), 24-48. [This bank opened to receive the savings of the working poor, hoping to thus promote thrift, sobriety, and discipline.]

Burr, Chris. “’Roping in the Wretched, the Reckless, and the Wronged’: Narratives of the Late Nineteenth-Century Toronto Police Court.” Left History 3:1 (1995), 83-108. [Finds the influence of temperance reformers on Toronto’s newspaper police court columns between 1871 and 1891.]

Campbell, Robert. “Managing the Marginal: Regulating and Negotiating Decency in Vancouver’s Beer Parlours, 1925-1954.” Labour/Le Travail 44 (Fall 1999), 109-127.

Campbell, Robert. Sit Down and Drink Your Beer: Regulating Vancouver’s Beer Parlours, 1925-1954. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000.

Cook, Sharon Anne. “’A Gallant Little Band’: Bertha Wright and the Late Nineteenth-Century Evangelical Woman.” Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society 37:1 (1995), 3-21. [Portrait of Wright, WCTU and YWCA leader in Ottawa, Ontario, as a representative evangelical Christian woman activist of the time.]

Cook, Sharon Anne. “’Do Not . . . Do Anything that You Cannot Unblushingly Tell Your Mother’: Gender and Social Purity in Canada.” Social History 30:60 (1997), 215-238. [Traces the history of the social purity movement in Canada, attributing the first phase to the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union.]

Cook, Sharon Anne. “’Sowing Seed for the Master’: The Ontario WCTU And Evangelical Feminism, 1874-1930.” Journal of Canadian Studies 30:3 (1995), 175-194.

Cook, Sharon Anne. “Beyond the Congregation: Women and Canadian Evangelicalism Reconsidered.” In G.A. Rawlyk, ed., Aspects of the Canadian Evangelical Experience (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1997), 403-416, 516-519.

Corkum, Hugh H. On Both Sides of the Law: The Exciting Personal Story of a Former Rum Runner and Flamboyant Police Chief. 1989; rpt. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Nimbus, 2000.

Crowley, Terry. “J. J. Morrison and the Transition in Canadian Farm Movements during the Early Twentieth Century.” Agricultural History 71:3 (1997), 330-356. [Biography of Morrison, who graduated from temperance reform and voluntary farm associations to found and lead the United Farm Organization.]

Estabrooks, Trisha C. “From Petticoats to Politics: The Prohibition Movement in New Brunswick, 1878-1927.” M.A. Thesis, Mt. Allison University, 1999.

Fahey, David M. Review of Jan Noel, Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation (1995). Historian 59:1 (1996), 151-152.

Fischer, B. “Prohibition, Public Health and a Window of Opportunity: An Analysis of Canadian Drug Policy, 1985-1997.” Policy Studies 20:3 (1999), 197.

Grabowski, Jan. “Le ‘petit commerce’ entre les Trifluviens et les Amerindiens en 1665-1667.” Recherches Amerindiennes au Quebec 28:1 (1998), 105-121. [Examines the court documents from a 1667 investigation of the liquor trade between inhabitants of Three Rivers and Amerindians.]

Gutkin, Harry, and Mildred Gutkin. “’Give Us Our Due!’: How Manitoba Women Won the Vote.” Manitoba History 32 (1996), 12-25. [Recounts the part played by the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union in making Manitoba the first Canadian province to grant the vote to women (1916).]

Hebert, Fernand. La Philanthropie et la Violence Maritale: le Cas de la Montreal Society for the Protection of Women and Children et de la Woman’s Christian Temperance Union of the Province of Quebec. Montreal: Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 1999.

Hunt, C.W. Booze, Boats and Billions: Smuggling Liquid Gold. Belleville, Ontario: Bella Flint Publications, 2000.

Hunt, C.W. Gentleman Charlie & the Lady Rumrunner: The Story of the Only Woman to Smuggle Whisky Across Lake Ontario during US Prohibition and Get Away With It. Bancroft, Ontario: Bella Flint Publications, 1999.

James, Jennifer. “Ada Powers’ Diaries: Politics, Sisterhood, and the WCTU.” Atlantis 20:1 (1995), 63-76. [Describes Powers’s involvement with the WCTU circa 1920.]

Kapusta, Beth. “Liveable Lodge: Central City Lodge Inner City Health Care Facility, Vancouver.” The Canadian Architect 41 (August 1996), 28. [Examines the architecture of the Central City Lodge Inner City Health Care Facility in Vancouver.]

Langley, Andrew. London Pride: 150 years of Fuller, Smith and Turner 1845-1995. Melksham: Good Books, 1995.

Lauzon, Rene. “Mattagami First Nation’s Policy to Reduce Alcohol Related Harm.” Canadian Journal of Native Studies 18:1 (1998), 37-48.

Malleck, Daniel J. “’Its Baneful Influences are Too Well Known’: Debates over Drug Use in Canada, 1867-1908.” Canadian Bulletin of Medical History 14:2 (1997), 263-288.

Malleck, Daniel J. “Priorities of Development in Four Local Woman’s Christian Temperance Unions in Ontario, 1877-1895.” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 189-208. [Abstract: “The differences and similarities among four local Woman’s Christian Temperance Unions in Ontario (in London, Ottawa, Newmarket, and Dunville) provide valuable comparisons and an insight into the nature of the WCTU in its early years. A study of these locals between 1878 and 1895 reveals a uniformity in the focus of their early work, which the unions modified over time in response to community conditions. All four began by following evangelical modes of community reform. Much of their work followed a class-based strategy. Some unions focused on the children of labourers, while others concentrated on reaching working-class adults. The Dunnville WCTU disbanded, partly due to the members’ reluctance to pursue work in the wide community. Issues pertaining to gender, race, or eugenics became important only after the women had undertaken class-based, evangelical reform work” (189).]

Malleck, Daniel Joseph. “Refining Poison, Defining Power: Medical Authority and the Creation of Canadian Drug Prohibition Laws, 1800-1908.” Ph.D. Dissertation, Queen’s University at Kingston, 1999.

Marks, Lynne Sorrel. Revivals and Roller Rinks: Religion, Leisure, and Identity in Late-Nineteenth-Century Small-Town Ontario. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996. [Chapter 4: “Rough and Respectable: Loafers, Drinkers, and Temperance Workers.”]

Marquis, Greg. “Rum Riot at Dundas.” Island Magazine 43 (1998), 8-12. [Describes a riotous 1860 confrontation between “wets” and “drys” over an illegal tavern on Prince Edward Island.]

McCalla, Douglas. Consumption Stories: Customer Purchases of Alcohol at an Upper Canadian Country Store in 1808-1809 and 1828-1829. Sainte-Foy, Quebec: Centre Interuniversitaire d’etudes Quebecoises, 1999.

Noel, Janet. Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1995.

Phillips, Glen C. On Tap: The Odyssey of Beer and Brewing in Victorian London- Middlesex. Sarnia, Ontario: Cheshire Cat Press, 2000.

Pope, Peter. “Fish into Wine: The Historical Anthropology of Demand for Alcohol in Seventeenth-Century Newfoundland.” In Jack Blocker and Cheryl Krasnick Warsh, eds. The Changing Face of Drink: Substance, Imagery, and Behaviour (Ottawa, Canada: Social History, Inc., 1997), 43-64. [Abstract: “A strong demand for alcohol and tobacco in seventeenth-century Newfoundland and throughout the North American fishing periphery is an example of the distinct role maritime communities played in the emergence of a consumer society. Exchange of these little luxuries served social and cultural as well as economic needs. Demand for red wines and brandy in particular reflected contemporary humoral theories about the human metabolism. In this period, distribution, no less than restriction, of alcohol can be seen as a form of social control” (43).]

Roberts, H. Julia. “Taverns and Tavern-Goers in Upper Canada, the 1790s to the 1850s.” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Toronto, 1999.

Sethna, Christabelle. “Men, Sex, and Education: The Ontario Women’s Temperance Union and Children’s Sex Education, 1900-20.” Ontario History 88:3 (1996), 185-206. [Traces the history of sex education in Ontario from the early programs advocated by the local WCTU to the beginnings of the physician-led hygiene movement of the post-World War I era.]

Sweet, Richard. Directory of Canadian Breweries (Past and Present). 2nd ed. Saskatoon: R.L. Sweet, 1996.

Szymanski, Ann-Marie. “Dry Compulsions: Prohibition and the Creation of State Level Enforcement Agencies.” Journal of Policy History 11:2 (1999), 115-146.

Tyrrell, Ian. Review of Jan Noel, Canada Dry: Temperance Crusades before Confederation (1995). Journal of American History 83:1 (1996), 209-210.

Wilson, S. Craig. “’Our Common Enemy’: Censorship Campaigns of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and the National Council of Women of Canada, 1890-1914.” Canadian Journal of Women And The Law/Revue Juridique La Femme Et Le Droit 10:2 (1998), 438.

These citations originally appeared in recent “Current Literature” sections of The Social History of Alcohol Review. Jon Miller and David Fahey compiled and edited them. They were also available on the Alcohol and Drugs History Society’s old website, http://athg.org.

Posted by Jon Miller on May 21, 2005 at 11:10 AM in Beer, Brandy, Brewing , Canada, Drinking Spaces, Drugs (general), Licensing and Legislation, Prohibition, Temperance, Wine | Permalink

Miller pushing low-end beer

The St Louis Business Journal reports (13 May 2005) that Miller Brewing Co. wants to build market share in the subpremium beer market, according to a media report. For the first time in a decade, it plans to use television ads to push Milwaukee's Best and Miller High Life, the report said. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 19, 2005 at 02:35 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Beer drinkers start praying for rain

The Chicago Sun-Times reports (24 April 2005) that while the Pacific Northwest is the US' largest producer of hops, a key ingredient in beer, the region is enduring what water managers say is its worst drought since 1977. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 15, 2005 at 05:19 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

SABMiller to Acquire Stake in Topvar

The New York Times reports (9 May 2005) from Bratislva, Slovakia that London-based SABMiller PLC, one of the world's largest brewers, said it has signed a deal to acquire a bigger stake in Slovak brewery Topvar as part of efforts to strengthen its position in central Europe. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 13, 2005 at 08:58 AM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Slovakia | Permalink

Warm beer cure

London, Ontario's London Free Press reports (11 May 2005) that warm beer, the bane of Canadian summers, may soon be banished to the history books, thanks to a made-in-London innovation. A new high-tech can, which Labatt Breweries is claiming as a world's first, will keep beer colder longer. It was developed at the Labatt Innovation Centre, part of the brewer's London operation. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 12, 2005 at 12:07 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

The National Brewing Library at Oxford Brookes University

The website of the National Brewing Library at Oxford Brookes University, UK, can be found here. The National Brewing Library was officialy opened on 10 December 2002. It comprises approximately 4,500 volumes relating to brewing, distilling, beer, whisky and other alcoholic beverages, and dependent trades, mainly in the English language. The collection aims to be the primary and most comprehensive source of information in the UK, on the scientific, technological, historical and social aspects of the above.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 8, 2005 at 03:13 PM in Advertising, Alcohol (general), Beer, Brewing , Britain, Libraries and Archives, Licensing and Legislation, Temperance, United Kingdom, Whiskey | Permalink

Trouble brewing in Canadian beer industry

The Globe and Mail reports (7 May 2005) that Canada's breweries, under attack from wine and spirits makers and chasing a shrinking customer base, are waging a pitched price battle to stay alive. Find the full story here. (Thanks to Dan Malleck for the link).

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 7, 2005 at 07:04 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada, Wine | Permalink

Heineken buys Russian brewery

Novosti, the Russian News and Information Agency, reports (7 May 2005) that Dutch brewery Heineken has bought the Patra brewery in Yekaterinburg (Ural) outright, a Heineken press release reads. The press release says the deal will lead to higher profits in 2005 and increase the value of the company by 2010. As a result of the deal, Heineken's share of the Russian beer market will grow to 8.3%, more than seven million hectoliters (184 million gallons). Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 7, 2005 at 02:27 AM in Beer, Brewing , Netherlands, Russia | Permalink

Miller Brewing (Book)

John Gurda, Miller Time: A History of Miller Brewing Company, 1855-2005 ([Milwaukee]: Miller Brewing Company, 2005.  180 pages, with illustrations.

Posted by David Fahey on May 6, 2005 at 03:49 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Brewery takeover opposed

The Guardian reports (28 April 2005) that the Campaign for Real Ale is writing to thousands of small shareholders in Cumbrian brewery Jennings Brothers urging them to reject a £46m takeover offer from Wolverhampton & Dudley. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 2, 2005 at 08:14 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

World's second-richest man thinks the world's largest brewer is 'fascinating'

The Washington Post reports (30 April 2005) that Warren Buffett has called his new stake in Anheuser-Busch Cos., the world's largest brewer, an investment in a "fascinating" industry that nevertheless may not generate quick payoffs for Berkshire shareholders. St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch's announcement on April 21 that Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc. had acquired an unspecified "significant" stake in the company sent its shares up more than 6 percent. Investors keenly watch, and often promptly follow, the investment activity of Buffett, the world's second-richest person. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on May 2, 2005 at 03:10 PM in Beer, Brewing | Permalink

Inmates make own alcohol...then take over cell block

Boston's Channel 5 News reports (20 April 2005) from Walpole, Massachusetts that prison officials are investigating how eight inmates at a state maximum security prison - apparently drunk on alcohol they brewed themselves - managed to take over their cell block. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 30, 2005 at 08:32 AM in Alcohol (general), Brewing , United States | Permalink

Nigerian breweries closing

Vanguard (Lagos) reports (20 April 2005) that authorities of the Nigerian Breweries Plc met on April 21 with officials of the Abia State government to brief them on the reasons behind the recent closure of the company's brewery in Aba and the subsequent laying off of the workers. The workers were taken aback early this month when information filtered in that the management had decided to close the brewery which is one of the highest employers of labour in the commercial city. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 28, 2005 at 08:02 PM in Africa, Beer, Brewing , Nigeria | Permalink

Scottish and Newcastle defending its Russian beer market

The Scotsman reports (26 April 2005) that S&N shareholders will cheer once again on news that, where growth in beer sales is sluggish throughout Western Europe, in Russia, the Ukraine, the Baltic states and Kazakhstan the trend remains sharply upward. Leading the charge is BBH, the S&N joint venture with Carlsberg, described by one City analyst as "the only sexy part of their beer business." Baltic Beverages Holdings holds three of the top six brands in Russia, amounting to 34 per cent of total market share. Since its foundation in 1991, the Baltika brand has intertwined itself with Russia’s newly prosperous lifestyle. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 28, 2005 at 04:56 PM in Beer, Brewing , Estonia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Scotland, Ukraine | Permalink

Germany's Love Affair with Beer Cools

DW-World reports (24 April 2005) that contrary to popular cliche, beer in Germany doesn't come out of the kitchen faucet. In fact, it's going into fewer glasses these days. Germans are drinking less of the sudsy stuff and brewers are getting alarmed. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 26, 2005 at 12:24 PM in Beer, Brewing , Germany | Permalink

Crackdown on illegal breweries

The Star Online reports (18 April 2005) from Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia that the illegal production and sale of traditional liquor and spirits is worrying the Sabah Customs Department, which has begun a statewide crackdown against operators. The discovery of an illegal distillery in a village in Penampang prompted the department to carry out statewide checks to ensure that these “breweries” were operating with proper licences. Sabah Customs deputy director (preventive) Mohd Yusop Mansor said the department was monitoring the activities of such “moonshiners” who operate in the backyards of kampung houses in various districts in the state. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 26, 2005 at 10:04 AM in Brewing , Malaysia, Moonshine | Permalink

Beer tax would harm Ohio breweries

Columbus' Business First reports (15 April 2005) that Gov. Bob Taft's proposed tax reform package intends to make Ohio businesses more competitive. It seeks to create jobs and stimulate the economy. In reality, though, for the tens of thousands of Ohio men and women who work in or support the beer industry, the opposite is true. That's why, when it comes to doubling the state beer tax, lawmakers are being encouraged to look hard at the effect such legislation would have on the state's beer industry. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 21, 2005 at 10:25 AM in Beer, Brewing , Licensing and Legislation, United States | Permalink

Beer and Brewing (Book)

I. Hornsley, A History of Beer and Brewing (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2004).  This is a substantial volume--over 600 pages--with six of its nine chapters devoted to the period before 1600.

Posted by David Fahey on April 19, 2005 at 10:43 AM in Brewing | Permalink

Tetley English ale delivers smooth, mild taste

APP.com recounts (29 March 2005) the history of the Tetley Brewery in the Yorkshire city of Leeds. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 17, 2005 at 07:37 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

Brewers and Distillers Paradise (Article)

Greg Marquis, "'Brewers and Distillers Paradise': American Views of Canadian Alcohol Policies, 1919 to 1935," Canadian Review of American Studies 34/2 (2004): 135-66.

Posted by David Fahey on April 16, 2005 at 03:20 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Greene King brew is top of the hops

The Bury Free Press reports that a Bury St Edmunds brew has been recognised as the Britain's favourite. Greene King IPA is now officially the number one beer in the cask ale market – crowning a successful year for the flagship brand. IPA scooped a gold award at the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) bitter category at the annual Great British Beer Festival 2004 – and also claimed silver in the CAMRA champion beer of Britain 2004 award. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 13, 2005 at 03:11 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

Try SA's strongest beer

IAfrica.com reports (8 April 2005) on Paulaner Bräuhaus, brewers of Germany's strongest beer, Salvator (weighing in at a knee trembling 8.5 percent), and the brewers' annual Beerfest.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 10, 2005 at 01:02 PM in Beer, Brewing , Germany | Permalink

Ruling eases Germany's beer law

BBC News reported on 25 February 2005 that a German court has upheld a brewer's challenge to the country's centuries-old beer purity laws. The ruling means Helmut Fritsche's Klosterbrauerei Neuzelle brewery can continue adding sugar syrup to its dark brew and still call it "beer." The 1516 beer purity law limits beer ingredients to malted grain, hops, yeast and water. Mr Fritsche's brewery adds sugar syrup after fermentation. The ruling ends a 10-year legal battle by the small east German brewery.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 9, 2005 at 08:36 AM in Beer, Brewing , Germany, Licensing and Legislation | Permalink

Ruling eases Germany's beer law

BBC News reported on 25 February 2005 that a German court has upheld a brewer's challenge to the country's centuries-old beer purity laws. The ruling means Helmut Fritsche's Klosterbrauerei Neuzelle brewery can continue adding sugar syrup to its dark brew and still call it "beer." The 1516 beer purity law limits beer ingredients to malted grain, hops, yeast and water. Mr Fritsche's brewery adds sugar syrup after fermentation. The ruling ends a 10-year legal battle by the small east German brewery.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 9, 2005 at 08:36 AM in Beer, Brewing , Germany, Licensing and Legislation | Permalink

Sam Adams tour toasts Boston's rich brewery history

USA Today reports (21 March 2005) that the Boston of a century ago was a beer-brewing hub to rival Midwestern suds capitals such as Milwaukee, St. Louis and Chicago. Research by local historians has turned up evidence of 31 operating breweries inside the city limits in the late 19th century. But few visible reminders of the industry remain — except a two-decades-old beer named after one of the city's fieriest Revolutionary War patriots. The Samuel Adams Brewery Tour and its Boston Beer Museum is the chief repository of the city's brewing history — a place to learn about the past and toast the legacy by downing some sample Sam Adams varieties.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 5, 2005 at 12:27 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Heineken Buys Stake in Chinese Brewery

ABC News reports (1 April 2005) that Dutch brewer Heineken NV has bought a 40 percent share in a Chinese beer maker via its Asian joint venture company Asia Pacific Breweries Ltd., expanding its interests in the world's biggest beer market. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on April 4, 2005 at 03:13 PM in Beer, Brewing , China, Netherlands | Permalink

18th Cent. American Brewing (Book)

David Alan Woolsey, Libations of the Eighteenth Century: A Concise Manual for the Brewing of Authentic Beverages from the Colonial Era of America, and of Times Past (Universal Publishers, 2002).

Posted by David Fahey on April 2, 2005 at 08:47 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink

Beer in Quebec (Book)

Sylvain Daignault, Histoire de la biere au Quebec (Montreal: Trait d'union, 2004).

Posted by David Fahey on April 2, 2005 at 08:45 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

Women Brewers (Book)

Judith M. Bennett, Ale, Beer and Brewsters in England: Women's Work in a Changing World, 1300-1600 (Oxford University Press, 1996).

Posted by David Fahey on April 1, 2005 at 07:48 PM in Brewing | Permalink

American Breweries (Book)

Bill Yenne, The American Brewery from Colonial Evolution to Microbrew Revolution (Motorbooks, 2003).

Posted by David Fahey on April 1, 2005 at 07:47 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Beer and the American flag just don't go together: prohibition against advertising depicting the American flag

The Newport News-Times reports (25 March 2005) that Rogue Ales, which operates its brewery in South Beach, received a government citation recently ordering the removal of all point-of-sale merchandise that includes a depiction of the American flag. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2005 at 08:32 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Old Books about Guinness

1339Patrick Lynch and John Vaizey, Guinness's Brewery in the Irish Economy, 1759-1876 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1960); [No author], Guinness Dublin: A History of St. James's Gate Brewery (St. James's Gate Brewery, 1948).

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2005 at 03:12 PM in Beer, Brewing , Ireland | Permalink

Japanese Beer Makers Eye Korea's Jinro

Chosun (Daily News in English about Korea) reports (27 March 2005) that Japan's leading beer companies are joining a bid to take over Korea's largest soju or traditional Korean liquor maker Jinro. Asahi Breweries, with a 38.4 percent share of the Japanese beer market, has agreed to form a consortium with Korea's Lotte Chilsung, and Kirin Brewery with a 36.2 percent share of the Japanese beer market with CJ Group. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 29, 2005 at 11:13 AM in Beer, Brewing , Japan, Korea | Permalink

Coors pours out 2 per cent lager

The Publican reports (23 March 2005) that Coors Brewers has revealed it wants to get its new two per cent lager into 5,000 outlets by the end of the year. C2 was launched at the end of December following a decade of trials and different recipes as Coors looks to break into the as yet untouched low alcohol lager market. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 28, 2005 at 12:55 PM in Alcohol (miscellaneous), Beer, Brewing | Permalink

Northern Breweries Launches Eagle Lager

The Post (Lusaka) reports (21 March 2005) that Northern Breweries will next month launch a new brand of clear sorghum-based beer called Eagle Lager on the market. The move by the company, which is a subsidiary of Zambian Breweries Plc, will bring the number of the group's lager brands to four, after Rhino, Castle and Mosi lagers. Eagle Lager will have 5.5 per cent alcohol content. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 22, 2005 at 04:23 PM in Beer, Brewing , Zambia | Permalink

Top 50 American Breweries Reflect the Diversity of American Beer

The Brewers Association reports (14 March 2005) that, located in 19 different states, the top 50 American brewing companies of 2004 produce a wide range of beers that reflect the diverse flavors of America's vibrant beer culture, according to the Brewers Association. From golden light lagers to silky black stouts, the leading domestic brewers populate America's coolers with scores of beer brands across dozens of distinct styles. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 21, 2005 at 04:04 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Beer and Buddhism in Thailand

IPS News Agency reports (21 March 2005) that the beer business and Buddhism, in Thailand it seems, do not mix. And that will be the message the Stock Exchange of Thailand has to heed when it meets Wednesday to decide whether to allow the public listing of Thai Beverages, brewer of the country's best-selling Beer Chang or ''Elephant Beer." On Friday, over 2,000 monks from the Thai Buddhist Monks National Coordination Center made their way to the stock exchange headquarters in Bangkok's Ratchadaphisek area and chanted prayers outside the building to condemn liquor companies. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 21, 2005 at 03:33 PM in Beer, Brewing , Thailand | Permalink

Academics slam liquor company's listing plan

The Bangkok Post News reports (18 March 2005) that academics in Thailand have teamed up with activists to block a move by Thai Beverages Ltd to sell stock, saying allowing an alcohol-producing firm to go public will only harm society. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 19, 2005 at 05:04 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Thailand | Permalink

Green beer? Blarney. Real Irish ale rules

The San Francisco Chronicle reports (17 March 2005) on the history of Smithwick's ("smith-icks" in Ireland, with a silent "w"), the oldest ale in Eire, dating to 1710, when John Smithwick built a brewery on the grounds of St. Francis Abbey in Kilkenny (Guinness didn't come along until 1759). Smithwick remained in private ownership until Guinness took control in the 1960s. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 19, 2005 at 03:12 PM in Beer, Brewing , Ireland | Permalink

Caffeine in Beer

PR Direct reports (17 March 2005) from Mississauga, Ontario that Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD Canada) is calling on the Federal and Provincial Governments to hold Molson and Labatt breweries accountable for their planned release of their high-octane-caffeinated-brews. The organization is upset with what they term a 'dangerous product' that is being marketed at young drinkers - those who are most likely to be involved in drunken, risky behaviour. Find the full report here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 19, 2005 at 11:07 AM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Caffeine, Canada | Permalink

Beer tax increase in Ohio protested

The Cincinnati Enquirer reports (18 March 2005) on Ohio state's proposed tax hike on beer. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 18, 2005 at 12:17 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Budweiser (Article)

Sanford Wexler, "From Soap Suds to Beer Suds: How Anheuser-Busch Became the Largest Brewer in the World," Financial History 77 (2002): 30-33, 37.  Technology (pasteurization, refrigeration)  and advertising (esp.. TV).

Posted by David Fahey on March 17, 2005 at 10:29 PM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing | Permalink

Rwandan coffee used to make beer

BBC News reported in December 2004 that a London brewery has started producing beer brewed from Rwandan coffee beans. The beer, which has a 4% alcohol content, is targeted at adult drinkers as a cappucino drink or as a digestif. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 17, 2005 at 02:16 PM in Beer, Brewing , Coffee, Rwanda | Permalink

Beer in Britain during WWII (Book)

One of the few studies of alcohol history in mid-20th-century Britain is a book directed at a popular audience and published with the support of the Brewers & Licensed Retailers Association, Brian Glover, Brewing for Victory: Brewers, Beer and Pubs in World War II (Cambridge: Lutterworth, 1995).  Glover also has written Prince of Ales: the History of Brewing in Wales (Brewers' Society, 1992; USA edition, Alan Sutton, 1993); Loyalty Pays: A History of the United Clubs Brewery (Stoud: Alan Sutton in association with Crown Buckley, 1995); and Beer: An Illustrated History (London: Hermes, 2000), a booklet-sized publication that had been part of a reference work by Glover, The World Encyclopedia of Beer (various editions).  He also edited What's Brewing.

Posted by David Fahey on March 16, 2005 at 07:50 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Canadian brewing (articles)

Bowering, Ian. Brewing in Formosa: 125 Years of Tradition. Burnstown, Ontario: General Store Publishing House, 1995. [History of breweries and the brewing industry in Formosa, Ontario, with especial focus on the history of the Algonquin Brewing Company.]

Langley, Andrew. London Pride: 150 years of Fuller, Smith and Turner 1845-1995. Melksham: Good Books, 1995.

Posted by Jon Miller on March 16, 2005 at 11:28 AM in Brewing , Canada | Permalink

'Joe, we hardly knew ye': Molson Canada's new ad campaign

CBC News reports (15 March 2005) that Molson Canada, now a subsidiary of Molson Coors Brewing Co., got back to beer-selling basics this week with a campaign it hopes will breathe new life into a flagship brand that's spent the last five years trapped beneath its own marketing success. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 16, 2005 at 10:18 AM in Advertising, Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

British Brewery Histories (Bibliography)

More sources culled from the old site:

Avis, Anthony. The Brewer's Tale: A History of Ale in Yorkshire. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995.

Jennnings, Paul. The Public House in Bradford, 1770-1970. Keele: Keele University Press, 1995.

O'Halloran, Michael. Old Goulburn Brewery: The Brewing Process. Goulburn, New South Wales: M. O'Halloran, 1995.

Redman, Nicholas. "Louis Pasteur and the Brewing Industry." The Brewer: Brewers' Guild Journal 81 (September 1995), 371.

Redman, Nicholas. "Magor Brewery 1979-1995: Manages an Exceptional Reservoir of Material at Chiswell Street." The Brewer: Brewers' Guild Journal 85 (August 1995), 403.

Redman, Nicholas. "Whitbread at Chiswell Street, 1749-1995." The Brewer: Brewers' Guild Journal 81 (June 1995), 239.

Posted by Jon Miller on March 15, 2005 at 06:52 AM in Brewing , Britain | Permalink

Cheap suds spared price hike in Manitoba

The Winnipeg Sun reports (9 March 2005) that the Province of Manitoba rejected a minimum mark-up for discount beer as proposed by the Manitoba Liquor Control Commission. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 14, 2005 at 02:12 PM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink

Utah microbrewery sees success

The Billings Gazette reports (12 March 2005) on Rooster's Brewing Co. in Ogden, Utah, which cranks out 700 31-gallon barrels of microbrewed craft beers every year for one of Ogden's most successful restaurants and is looking forward to overseeing another similar operation when Roosters opens its second location in Layton later this year.  Utah's strong religious culture has traditionally frowned on alcohol consumption, as some of the state's laws reflect. But social, moral and health issues aside, there's no denying the beverage's growing impact on the local economy. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 14, 2005 at 08:18 AM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Molson unveils new lager with a different type of kick - caffeine

Canada.com reports (13 March 2005) that Molson Canada announced Sunday that you'll soon be able to buy a beer with a different kind of kick - caffeine. Molson Kick is a lager that will contain guarana, a South American plant that's a natural source of caffiene. The beer will be available throughout Ontario, Quebec and Western Canada beginning March 21 and in the Atlantic provinces on April 1. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 13, 2005 at 11:45 PM in Beer, Brewing , Caffeine, Canada | Permalink

John Travolta does not drink Heineken, but has no trouble taking the company's money

New Kerala reports (12 March 2005) that John Travolta has said that he is a teetotaler and that he gave up drinking alcohol forever after getting drunk just once. All of this just two days after launching a major beer promotion campaign for Heineken. Find the gripping story of Travolta's water and tea drinking here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 13, 2005 at 08:14 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink

Montreal Breweries, 1788-1852 (Thesis)

Stephane Morin, "Brasseurs, Brasseries et Activites Brassicoles dans la Plaine de Montreal, 1788-1852" (M.A. thesis, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2000).

Apologies re missing accent marks.

Posted by David Fahey on March 13, 2005 at 05:04 PM in Brewing | Permalink

American Brewing Industry (Dissertation)

Martin Heidegger Stack, "Liquid Bread: An Examination of the American Brewing Industry, 1865-1940" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Notre Dame, 1998).

Posted by David Fahey on March 13, 2005 at 04:34 PM in Brewing | Permalink

Beer Price Probe

BBC News reports (11 March 2005) that the UK's Competition Commission has called for an inquiry into beer prices after blocking a deal by two brewers to buy a rival's pub equipment supply arm. The watchdog said the move was "good news" for pub companies and customers. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 13, 2005 at 03:50 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink

'Beer bandit' sentenced to 19 months in prison

'Honestly, officer, I have no idea where those 50,400 cans of Moosehead came from.' The National Post reports (10 March 2005) that Wade Haines, the man dubbed the "beer bandit," has been jailed for 19 1/2 months. The New Brunswick man was found guilty of stealing 50,400 cans of Moosehead beer he was supposed to drive from Moosehead's brewery in Saint John to Toronto. The truck driver was facing a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 12, 2005 at 11:08 AM in Beer, Brewing , Canada | Permalink | Comments (0)

Big brewers target young Latin Americans

MSNBC reports (9 March 2005) from Bogota that the world's giant brewers hope young and thirsty Latin Americans will bring faster profit growth than aging, carbohydrate-wary consumers in Europe and the United States. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 12, 2005 at 09:54 AM in Beer, Brazil, Brewing , China, Colombia, Czechoslovakia, Ireland, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Venezuela | Permalink | Comments (0)

Legend lives on in beer named for a saint

Asbury Park Press reports (8 March 2005) on the Saint Arnold Brewing Company, makers of a fine line of saintly beers. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 10, 2005 at 09:45 AM in Beer, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Vietnamese Beer Industry

Money Plans reports (8 March 2005) that large amounts of money are being pumped into new beer breweries in Vietnam, and with domestic demand not  expected to rise any time soon, the market is set to be awash, Ho Chi Minh City market experts have warned.  Beer production was 1.37 billion litres in 2004 and was estimated to rise to 1.5 billion litres this year, a figure originally expected to be reached in 2010, they said. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 10, 2005 at 08:33 AM in Beer, Brewing , Vietnam | Permalink | Comments (0)

A History of Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company

A history of the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company (1969-1982) can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 9, 2005 at 05:26 PM in Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Heineken leaves Angola or does it?

For The Namibia Economist, Desie Heita reported in April 2004 that Namibia Breweries Limited's beer may start entering Angola again as a piggyback on Heineken. An indication of this is the announcement straight from Amsterdam by the Heineken group that they sold their shares in two Angolan breweries. The Angolan breweries of which Heineken sold its shares, had a combined 15% of the Angolan beer market. Heineken owned 45% of Empresa Angolana de Cerveja (EKA) and 27% Nova Empresa de Cerveja de Angola (Nocal). Both brewer are located in Luanda. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 9, 2005 at 08:08 AM in Angola, Brewing , Namibia, Netherlands | Permalink | Comments (0)

Alcohol History Database

The Alcohol History Database, created by the Center of Alcohol Studies at Rutgers University and hosted by the Rutgers University Libraries, can be found here. The Alcohol History Collection is an assortment of over 500 monographs, pamphlets and journals on the Temperance and Prohibition movements. Includes images in the form of drawings, engravings, photographs, and portraits, in addition to samples of temperance regalia and banners. The dates of works range from the 1700s to 1960s, concentrating on the 19th and early 20th centuries. Themes in this collection include the alcohol beverage industry, psychological and physiological effects of alcohol, social and domestic problems stemming from alcohol abuse, legislation, and moral and religious aspects. They exist in various formats, including biographical sketches, personal testimonies, fiction works, scientific and medical essays, and accounts of organizations.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 8, 2005 at 04:24 PM in Alcohol (general), Brewing , Libraries and Archives, Temperance, United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Beer Academy Inspires a Thirst for Knowledge

For the Yorkshire Post, Chris Benfield reports that "beer is the new Chardonnay – or at least that's what the brewers are trying to convince us of." Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 6, 2005 at 12:20 PM in Beer, Brewing , United Kingdom | Permalink | Comments (0)

Ruling eases Germany's beer law

BBC News reported on 25 February 2005 that a German court has upheld a brewer's challenge to the country's centuries-old beer purity laws. The ruling means Helmut Fritsche's Klosterbrauerei Neuzelle brewery can continue adding sugar syrup to its dark brew and still call it "beer." The 1516 beer purity law limits beer ingredients to malted grain, hops, yeast and water. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 5, 2005 at 11:07 AM in Beer, Brewing , Germany | Permalink | Comments (0)

Far too much 'beerocracy' in German brewing

BBC News reported on 5 July 2004 that a German brewer launched a one-man campaign to relax the country's beer purity laws, which limit beer ingredients to hops, barley and water. Helmut Fritsche, owner of the Klosterbrauerei Neuzelle, claims the rules stifle the creativity of small brewers and should be eased. Mr Fritsche adds sugar syrup to one of his beers in open defiance of the law, known as the Reinheitsgebot. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 5, 2005 at 11:01 AM in Beer, Brewing , Germany | Permalink | Comments (0)

GM and MADD Targeted by Alcohol Industry

The Join Together news source reported on 3 January 2005 that the alcohol industry, angered by efforts to lower the legal blood-alcohol standard for drunk driving, is not only attacking Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), but also some of its financial sponsors, specifically, General Motors (GM). Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 3, 2005 at 05:15 PM in Alcohol (miscellaneous), Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Yorkshire brewery ends free pints for pensioners

PersonnelToday.com reported on 4 February 2005 that brewery group Scottish and Newcastle has called a halt to a 20-year old tradition and stopped offering free beer to retired brewery workers in Tadcaster, Yorkshire. Former John Smith's employees had enjoyed two free pints of beer or lager three times a week as part of an unofficial agreement with the brewery. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 3, 2005 at 12:58 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Scotland | Permalink | Comments (0)

Probably the best job in the Lothians

Adrian Mather reports for the Scotsman.com (1 March 2005) on Harvey Milne. For the past three years, the 58-year-old former brewer has been working as an independent, freelance assessor for Cask Marque - the beer equivalent of the Michelin Star rating - and is responsible for assessing the presentation and quality of lagers and cask beers in pubs across Scotland. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 3, 2005 at 10:55 AM in Beer, Brewing , Scotland | Permalink | Comments (0)

There's still no excuse for light beer: a history of the beer can and how it kicked off the taste in tinny beer

Madeleine Brindley reported for ICWales on 29 January 2005 on the history of selling beer in cans in the US, beginning in 1909. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 3, 2005 at 10:07 AM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bangladesh outlaws malt 'beers'

BBC News reported on 5 March 2004 that Bangladesh has banned two malt beverages that found a loophole in the Islamic country's bar on alcoholic drinks. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 2, 2005 at 07:11 PM in Bangladesh, Beer, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bangladesh 'beer' tests alcohol ban

BBC News reported on 19 February 2004 that a company in Bangladesh believes it has found a legal loophole to get around the Islamic country's ban on alcoholic drinks. But their discovery has created a furore among Islamic parties and the threat of legal action from at least one leading international brewer. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 2, 2005 at 07:09 PM in Bangladesh, Beer, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Brazil buy boosts Belgium's Inbev

BBC News reports (2 March 2005) that Belgian brewing giant Inbev has seen its profits soar thanks to its acquisition of Brazil's biggest beer firm Ambev last year. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on March 2, 2005 at 02:21 PM in Belgium, Brazil, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Breweries suffering as Western European market falls flat

For the Scotsman.com, Scott Reid reports (23 February 2005) that the world’s big brewers are seeing their profits flow in the wrong direction. It may be at odds with the lager-lout beer-swilling image, but sales in western Europe have fallen flat. In a bid to restore some much-needed fizz, companies such as Heineken, Carlsberg and brewer Scottish & Newcastle are looking to less mature markets, such as Russia and China. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 27, 2005 at 03:23 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, China, Hungary, Russia, Scotland | Permalink | Comments (0)

Diet beer? It's Bud vs. South Beach

Milwaukee's Journal Sentinel reported on 22 April 2004 that according to the popular South Beach Diet, swilling a beer is one of the worst things to do if you're trying to lose weight.  But Anheuser-Busch Inc., the nation's largest brewer, disagrees - setting the stage for a battle between two pop culture camps. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 25, 2005 at 08:44 PM in Beer, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Kansas Brewing History

A brief history of the brewing industry in Kansas by Cindy Higgins, author of Kansas Breweries & Beer, 1854-1911 (1992), can be found here. The essay was originally printed in the Spring 1993 issue of Kansas History.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 24, 2005 at 02:17 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

American Beer Tray History

A pictoral history of American beer trays can be found here. Beer trays were one of many effective point-of-sale advertising pieces used by brewers before the current mainstays of radio and television advertising.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 23, 2005 at 09:08 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Brewers since 1800 (Book)

Richard G. Wilson and Terry R. Gourvish, eds., The Dynamics of the International Brewing Industry since 1800 (Routledge, 1998).

Posted by David Fahey on February 21, 2005 at 09:03 PM in Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Scottish Breweries (Book)

Ian Donnachie, A History of the Brewing Industry in Scotland (2nd ed., Edinbugh: John Donald, 1998).  1st ed., 1979.

Posted by David Fahey on February 21, 2005 at 04:20 PM in Brewing , Scotland | Permalink | Comments (0)

CBC: The Beer Industry in Canada

A marvelous site, part of the CBC Archives, entitled "Selling Suds: The Beer Industry in Canada," can be found here. The site includes some 22 video clips addressing the history of Canada's beer industry; the impact of beer advertising on society; the light beer controversy; the sad farewell to the stubby beer bottle; home brewers, microbreweries, and "designer beer;" the merger of Molson and Carling; beer tasting events; the effect of free trade on Canada's breweries; the ice beer wars between Molson and Labatt; the Belgian takeover of Labatt; the union of Molson and Coors; the infamous "I...Am...Canadian" Molson beer commercial, and more. The site includes a link to the French-language site on the same subject, entitled Bière : ça brasse au Canada!, at Les Archives de Radio-Canada.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 21, 2005 at 09:00 AM in Beer, Brewing , Canada, Internet Resources | Permalink | Comments (0)

British Breweries (Book)

Terry R. Gourvish and Richard G. Wilson, The British Brewing Indusry, 1830-1980 (Cambridge University Press, 1994). Standard work.

Posted by David Fahey on February 20, 2005 at 09:45 PM in Brewing , Britain | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Müller Brewery at Neuchâtel (Book Review)

Hélène Pasquier, "La Chasse à l’hectolitre”: La Brasserie Müller à Neuchâtel, 1885–1953. [The Hectoliter Hunt: The Müller Brewery at Neuchâtel, 1885–1953] (Neuchâtel: Editions Alphil, 2001), reviewed by Rebecca Spang, for Business History Review (Summer 2002). The review can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 19, 2005 at 12:05 PM in Book Reviews, Brewing , Switzerland | Permalink | Comments (0)

Boston's Brewery Past Lives on at Sam Adams Brewery

The Boston Herald reports (16 February 2005) that research by local historians who pored over city records has turned up evidence of 31 operating breweries inside the city limits in the late 19th century. But efforts to preserve the past have gained little momentum. And that has left the Samuel Adams Brewery Tour and its Boston Beer Museum the chief repository of the city's brewing history.  Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 18, 2005 at 11:36 AM in Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

China is Top Beer Producer

Modern Brewery Age reported (6 September 2004) that China accounted for 17.1 percent of world beer production in 2003, keeping it firmly in position as the largest beer producing country in the world, analysts at Kirin Brewery Co. report. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 18, 2005 at 10:10 AM in Beer, Brewing , China | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wisconsin Beer Maker in Japan (Article)

Jeff Haas,"'They Have No Idea What It Is to Run a Malthouse': A Wisconsin Beer Maker in Japan," Wisconsin Magazine of History 87/2 (2003-04): 14-29.

Posted by David Fahey on February 17, 2005 at 01:09 PM in Beer, Brewing , Japan, United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Breweries Records (Book)

Lesley Richmoned and Alison Turton, eds., The Brewing Industry: A Guide to Historical Records (Manchester University Press, 1990).  British breweries.  Since the 1990 publication, the reorganization of the British drink trade often has meant a redistribution of historical records.

Posted by David Fahey on February 17, 2005 at 07:58 AM in Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

Japan Turns to Beer Alternatives

BBC News reports (15 February 2005) that Japanese brewers are increasingly making money from beer-flavoured drinks rather than beer itself.  Beer and spirits are heavily taxed in Japan, driving breweries to search for alternatives. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 17, 2005 at 12:00 AM in Beer, Brewing , Japan | Permalink | Comments (0)

Papers of the Brewers and Licensed Retailers Association

A description of the University of Warwick Library's collection of the Brewers and Licensed Retailers Association's papers can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 16, 2005 at 08:10 PM in Brewing , Britain, Libraries and Archives | Permalink | Comments (0)

Krönleins Brewery in Sweden

A history of Sweden's Krönleins Brewery, founded by Anders Julius Appeltofft in 1836, can be found here. The essay discusses the introduction of Munich beer in Sweden in 1843.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 15, 2005 at 03:37 PM in Brewing , Germany, Sweden | Permalink | Comments (0)

India Pale Ale

Part One, "IPA and Empire: Necessity and Enterprise Give Birth to a Style," of Thom Tomlinson's fascinating history of the invention of India Pale Ale and its early development in 18th century Britain can be found here. Part Two, "The Sun Never Sets," which discusses the resurgence of interest in traditional India Pale Ales, both in the United States and in England, and reviews brewing techniques, can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 14, 2005 at 11:34 AM in Brewing , Britain, India | Permalink | Comments (0)

Lifting a Glass to Schmidt Brewery

For the St. Paul Pioneer Press, Tammy J. Oseid reports (13 February 2005) that on Friday Schmidt Brewery, just short of its 150th anniversary, will be sold at a bankruptcy auction to the highest bidder.  Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 13, 2005 at 11:57 AM in Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Church of England Upholds Ban on Communion with Brewing Industry

The Publican reports (10 February 2005) that after an in-depth policy review the Church of England has concluded it will not invest in beer-related industries. A statement released by the Church cited “…the current national debate on the misuse of alcohol and a growing binge-drinking culture; and the increasing number of negative health and social implications of the increase in alcohol consumption, particularly amongst young and underage drinkers,” as its primary reasons for avoiding alcohol related investments. Find the full story here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 12, 2005 at 11:49 PM in Brewing , Britain | Permalink | Comments (0)

Kirin Brewery in Japan set to Dive into Quasi-Beer Fray

For The Japan Times Online, Taiga Uranaka reports (9 February 2005) that Kirin Brewery Co. announced Tuesday it will release a malt-free beerlike alcoholic beverage on April 6, joining its biggest rival Asahi Breweries Ltd. in the so-called third-beer market pioneered by Sapporo Breweries Ltd. and Suntory Ltd. The new suds have been growing in popularity thanks to prices that are lower than beer and its low-malt cousin "happoshu," which are taxed differently according to their malt levels.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 11, 2005 at 11:11 PM in Beer, Brewing , Japan | Permalink | Comments (0)

United Breweries to pick up stake in Karnataka Breweries

HindustanTimes.com reports (7 February 2005) that United Breweries Ltd, controlled by liquor baron Vijay Mallaya, has raised its authorised share capital to Rs 280 crore from Rs 250 crore and will invest up to Rs 180 crore to pick up stake in Karnataka Breweries and Distilleries Pvt Ltd. The full story can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 8, 2005 at 12:14 PM in Brewing , India | Permalink | Comments (0)

Boddington's Bitter End

For the Manchester News (4 February 2005), Neal Snowden reports on the closing of Boddingtons' 200-year old, Manchester brewery.

BBC News Online also reports (9 September 2004) on the closing of the Manchester brewery. Manchester's famous Boddingtons brewery is to close with production switched to Lancashire, Wales and Scotland. The full story can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 7, 2005 at 09:09 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink | Comments (0)

Anheuser-Busch Trivia

A page devoted to Anheuser-Busch Trivia can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 4, 2005 at 07:51 PM in Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)

Glasses Raised to Brewing Library

The website thisisoxfordshire.co.uk reports (14 December 2002) that Oxford Brookes University toasted the opening of the world's biggest brewing library, containing more than 3,600 books and journals about beer.  The first National Brewing Library will be on permanent loan at the university's Gypsy Lane campus, bringing together the collections of the Institute of Brewing, the International Brewers' Guild and the British Beer and Pub Association. It also contains the extensive Whitbread Brewing Archive.  The full article can be found here.

Posted by Matthew McKean on February 4, 2005 at 05:07 PM in Beer, Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces, Libraries and Archives | Permalink | Comments (0)

Boddington's Workers Admit Defeat

BBC News online reports (24 January 2005) that workers fighting to save the historic Boddingtons brewery in Manchester have abandoned their campaign. The Transport and General Workers Union ended its bid to save the 226-year-old Strangeways brewery claiming the management refused to listen. The full story can be found here

Posted by Jon Miller on February 4, 2005 at 11:02 AM in Beer, Brewing , Britain | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bibliography on the History of Brewing in England

An online bibliography on the History of Brewing prepared by James Sumner, Lecturer in History of Technology at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester, UK.

Sumner has produced a fairly comprehensive primary source bibliography of brewery manuals in Britain in the period 1700-1860. This, plus a collection of other sources of some relevance to his thesis, entitled "The metric tun: standardisation, quantification and industrialisation in the British brewing industry, 1760-1830."

The bibliography can be found here.

Posted by David Fahey on January 27, 2005 at 03:44 PM in Brewing , Britain, Online Bibliography | Permalink | Comments (0)

The History of Drinking and Brewing in Buffalo, NY

Steve Powell's site on the History of Drinking and Brewing in Buffalo, New York.  The site also includes images of Buffalo breweries, historical listings of Buffalo's brewers, and a listing of Buffalo's area micro-brewers.

Posted by David Fahey on January 22, 2005 at 04:17 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (1)

Gloucestershire Pubs

The Gloucestershire Pubs website: devoted to the history of pubs and breweries in the county of Gloucestershire, England.  The site includes links to breweries, pubs, photos, and feature articles.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 15, 2005 at 05:54 PM in Brewing , Britain, Drinking Spaces | Permalink | Comments (0)

Scottish Brewing Archive

A link to the website for the Scottish Brewing Archive, at the University of Glasgow.  The site includes a summary catalogue of the collections, information about ongoing projects at the archive, and a gallery of exhibitions. 

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 14, 2005 at 01:48 PM in Brewing , Libraries and Archives, Scotland | Permalink | Comments (0)

Brewery History Society Page

A link to the Brewery History Society page.  The site includes a Table of Contents for its Journal, Brewery History, links to book reviews, a guide to the BHS Archive, a catalogue of defunct brewery liveries, and a host of other brewery-related information.

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 13, 2005 at 06:29 PM in Beer, Brewing | Permalink | Comments (0)

American Brewery History Page

A link to the American Brewery History Page.  The site includes a link to an online Beer History Library. 

Posted by Matthew McKean on January 13, 2005 at 06:23 PM in Beer, Brewing , United States | Permalink | Comments (0)