Starbucks to grow coffee in China

Starbucks will grow coffee in the Yunnan province of China.

https://business.globaltimes.cn/industries/2010-11/591953.html

Posted by David Fahey on November 14, 2010 at 11:49 AM in China, Coffee | Permalink

Tea trade in China and Tibet (book)

Michael Freeman, The Tea Horse Road: China's Ancient Trade Road to Tibet (River Books, forthcoming 2011).

Posted by David Fahey on October 30, 2010 at 11:46 AM in Books, China, Tea, Tibet | Permalink

Drink in Beijing and Shanghai (dissertation)

Hui Cheng, "A Tale of Two Cities: Drinking Practices and Problems in Two Metropolitan Cities in China, Beijing and Shanghai" (Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University, 2009).

Posted by David Fahey on October 23, 2010 at 02:18 PM in Alcohol (general), China | Permalink

Tobacco in China (book)

Carol A. Benedict, Golden-Silk Smoke: A History of Tobacco in China, 1550-2010 (University of California Press, forthcoming 2011).

Posted by David Fahey on October 12, 2010 at 01:02 PM in Books, China, Tobacco | Permalink

China's coffee culture

Forbes reports on China's coffee culture.  Coffee shops are mostly confined to big coastal cities, and coffee is expensive. In rural areas coffee lovers best carry there own packets of instant.  For more, see here.

Posted by David Fahey on April 28, 2010 at 09:48 PM in China, Coffee | Permalink

Introducing Chinese tea to India (book review)

Adrian Higgins, in Washington Post, March 28, 2010), reviewing Sarah Rose, For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History.  In fact, it was a Scotsman Robert Fortune (1812-1880) who smuggled tea plants out of China to create tea plantations in India.

Posted by David Fahey on March 30, 2010 at 09:04 PM in Book Reviews, Britain, China, India, Scotland, Tea | Permalink

China's chocolate Great Wall, with 560 chocolate terracotta-styled warriors

China imported 85 tons of Belgian chocolate to create near the Olympic site a chocolate wonderland.  It includes (in dark chocolate, with white chocolate as mortar) the Great Wall of China and much else more, such as an army of 560 chocolate soldiers modeled on the famous terracotta warriors.  For more, see here.  The chocolate wonderland is both a tourist attraction and a way of encouraging the Chinese (who eat very little chocolate) to acquire a taste for it.

Posted by David Fahey on January 31, 2010 at 12:56 PM in China, Chocolate | Permalink

Stone age rocked if you liked your liquor

Archaeologist Patrick McGovern reports that in 9000 BCE, long before the invention of the wheel, people in northern China created a fermented drink, a kind of mead using honey and fruit, that was 10% alcohol.  For more, see here.

Posted by David Fahey on January 2, 2010 at 10:34 PM in Alcohol (general), China | Permalink

Tea, China, and England (book)

Sarah Rose, For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink from China and Changed World History (Viking Adult, forthcoming, 2010).

Posted by David Fahey on September 29, 2009 at 04:21 PM in Books, China, Tea, United Kingdom | Permalink

More opium conference papers

World History Association conference, Salem, Massachusetts, June 25-28, 2009.


A. Uner Turgay (McGill University), American Trade in Turkish Opium in the 19th Century
John Wills (Southern California University), The First Inhalers: A World-Historical Question

Paul Winther (Eastern Kentucky University), The Missionaries are Right, the Missionaries are Wrong: Misery and Opium in China, 1756-1917.

Posted by David Fahey on June 2, 2009 at 08:49 PM in China, Opium, Turkey, United States | Permalink